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Debian Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel
Post date: December 29, 2005, 02:12 Category: System Views: 92
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
Fedora+Core The IPv6 Internet: Connect Today with Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 86
Tutorial quote: IPv6 is a key technology and a long-term solution to build scalable, reliable, manageable, secure, and high-performance IP networks. In this article, I demonstrated how to configure a Linux machine running Fedora Core 1 to support IPv6 and connect it to the IPv6 Internet using the Freenet6 service.
Linux iptables: The Linux Firewall Administration Program
Post date: November 29, 2005, 15:11 Category: Network Views: 86
Tutorial quote: This chapter covers the iptables firewall administration program used to build a Netfilter firewall. For those of you who are familiar with or accustomed to the older ipfwadm and ipchains programs used with the IPFW technology, iptables will look very similar to those programs. However, it is much more feature-rich and flexible, and it is very different on subtle levels.
SGI Installing IRIX 6.5 Across a Network
Post date: May 21, 2005, 06:05 Category: Installing Views: 119
Tutorial quote: Installing across a network may be desirable for a number of reasons, usually speed, convenience (disks/CDROM attached to remote system) or necessity. I've done network installs on O2s, Octanes and Indys; in each case, a remote disk file system contained local copies of all the relevant 6.5 media.
Debian Installing Debian onto USB flash media with everything encrypted
Post date: September 28, 2005, 12:09 Category: Security Views: 228
Tutorial quote: This is a simple procedure for installing Debian GNU/Linux onto a USB key flash media. It includes several configuration changes but tries to stay as close to a default debian install as possible.

This is useful for administrators that need to carry sensitive information or people concerned about their privacy.
Linux Linux stateful firewall design
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
Unix+clones Xen Disk I/O benchmarking: NetBSD dom0 vs Linux dom0
Post date: April 21, 2005, 06:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 107
Tutorial quote: Xen is a relatively new technology to enable several virtual machines (domU) to run on one computer. The purpose of this article is to determine what operating system (NetBSD or Linux) should be selected as domain 0 (dom0) operating system to get the best performance when running several CPU and disk intensive virtual machines at the same time.
Linux Linux 2.6: Compiling and Installing
Post date: April 15, 2005, 18:04 Category: System Views: 55
Tutorial quote: We'll look at the process of compiling and installing a new kernel safely, without overwriting the existing kernel.

You can install as many kernels as you like on a Linux system, and select the one you want to run at boot time. This makes it easy to test different kernels, and different kernel configurations, with particular sets of hardware or applications. The wise network admin always tests new kernels before running them on production machines.
Solaris How to Perform System Boot and Shutdown Procedures for Solaris 10
Post date: February 6, 2006, 02:02 Category: System Views: 43
Tutorial quote: System startup requires an understanding of the hardware and the operating system functions that are required to bring the system to a running state. This chapter discusses the operations that the system must perform from the time you power on the system until you receive a system logon prompt. In addition, it covers the steps required to properly shut down a system. After reading this chapter, you’ll understand how to boot the system from the OpenBoot programmable read-only memory (PROM) and what operations must take place to start up the kernel and Unix system processes.
Linux Creating Really Teensy ELF Executables for Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 34
Tutorial quote: If you're a programmer who's become fed up with software bloat, then may you find herein the perfect antidote.

This document explores methods for squeezing excess bytes out of simple programs. (Of course, the more practical purpose of this document is to describe a few of the inner workings of the ELF file format and the Linux operating system. But hopefully you can also learn something about how to make really teensy ELF executables in the process.)

Please note that the information and examples given here are, for the most part, specific to ELF executables on a Linux platform running under an Intel-386 architecture. I imagine that a good bit of the information is applicable to other ELF-based Unices, but my experiences with such are too limited for me to say with certainty.

The assembly code that appears in this document is written for use with Nasm. (Besides being more appropriate for our needs, Nasm's syntax beats the hell out of AT&T syntax for anyone who learned x86 assembly language before learning to use Gas.) Nasm is freely available and extremely portable; see http://nasm.sourceforge.net/.

Please also note that if you aren't a little bit familiar with assembly code, you may find parts of this document sort of hard to follow.