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OpenBSD Using OpenBSD
Post date: April 26, 2006, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 23
Tutorial quote: Many people responded to the call for OpenBSD and OpenSSH donations by purchasing an OpenBSD CD set. Those CDs are beginning to arrive in the mail, and when they do, how are you going to use them? If you're a software enthusiast who has never used OpenBSD before, you might enjoy installing it by yourself and figuring it out as you go. If, however, you're looking for a more practical approach to using OpenBSD as a desktop or server operating system, here's a guide to get you started.
Ubuntu Unofficial Ubuntu 5.04 Starter Guide
Post date: April 13, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 547
Tutorial quote: This is probably the best guide for beginners with Ubuntu. It will help you setup Ubuntu in no time. Amongst other things it will walk you through installing BitTorrent client, edonkey client, email clients, browsers and a lot more. Definitely worth checking out.
Gentoo EVMS Howto for Gentoo Linux
Post date: April 15, 2005, 00:04 Category: Hardware Views: 453
Tutorial quote: EVMS stands for Enterprise Volume Management System. It's a all-in-one utility written by IBM to manage disk partitions, logical volumes, software RAID and even filesystems.

It does everything from installing the partition table to mounting volumes, fscking and resizing them. It has a plugin mechanism which allow a user to extend EVMS with external drivers.
OpenBSD Rebuilding the OpenBSD kernel
Post date: April 24, 2005, 16:04 Category: System Views: 93
Tutorial quote: Users who want their OpenBSD machine to perform specific functions or need additional device drivers might want to customize their kernel. In other OS's, like some types of Linux, it is very popular to rebuild the kernel because the default is so bloated. For most users, the default OpenBSD kernel is sufficient; however, you should still apply kernel patches, which will require rebuilding and installing a fresh kernel.
Debian Installing SVN with apache on debian
Post date: March 20, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 36
Tutorial quote: Today I started to set up a SVN repository for our final year project. I tried to setup a SVN server using Apache2 so that the SVN repository is available to the client through the WebDAV/DeltaV protocol. Read on for a trial-and-error introduction.

The Version Control with Subversion book (by Ben Collins-Sussman, Brian W. Fitzpatrick & C. Michael Pilato) was very useful to me when I struggled with SVN. The e-version of the book also available for free.
Debian Debian RAID 1/5 system installer
Post date: May 28, 2005, 18:05 Category: Installing Views: 193
Tutorial quote: Instructions for installing a very clean Debian GNU/Linux system that boots from RAID 1, and has RAID 1 or RAID 5 root and data filesystems.

The examples assume two identical harddrives, sda and sdb, on which after a small boot partition, 1 GB is used for swap, 25 GB is used for the root filesystem and everything else is for a big "data" partition that will hold non-system stuff.
Ubuntu Installing Windows XP/2000 in Free VMWare Player
Post date: November 27, 2005, 12:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 216
Tutorial quote: This guide will allow you to install Windows XP or 2000 solely with the VMWare Player. For the uninitiated, VMWare released a free application that allows users to run, but not create virtual machines. Using QEMU, we will create an environment suitable for use with the player.

As a side-note, I'd like to point out that VMWare makes quality software. If you require additional functionality, consider upgrading to Workstation.
OpenBSD Failover Firewalls with OpenBSD and CARP
Post date: April 27, 2005, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 231
Tutorial quote: Firewalls are a required component in commercial and residential computer networks. For many installations, the firewall is a single point of failure between client systems and external resources. It can also become a liability when hardware or applications fail, leaving potential customers unable to reach your servers. A properly designed and executed failover configuration for your primary firewall will address many of these concerns. This article introduces a proven method for installing redundant stateful firewalls using native OpenBSD features.
Debian Installing and Configuring Exim4
Post date: February 25, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 88
Tutorial quote: Installion of Exim4 from the latest Debian GNU/Linux packages is easy. The installation is now based around debconf. If you are upgrading from a simple Exim3 configuration, you can use exim_convert4r4 to convert your configuration file to the new format. If you used the previous version of this guide, which covered Exim3, the conversion should succeed without incident. I intend to discuss configuration via debconf, including setting up local delivery to Maildir format, handling local domain email, and configuring smarthosting for outbound email.
Unix+clones A web server in a shell script
Post date: March 14, 2006, 03:03 Category: Programming Views: 30
Tutorial quote: Suppose you want to experiment a little with web pages and CGI's, but you don't want the hassle of installing the full Apache package. This quick and dirty shell script could just be what you need.

Put simply, a web server is an application that sends local text files over the network to the clients that request them. If you let another program (for example inetd) deal with the network part, the web server could be reduced to a mere cat "$filename" to stdout. Of course, the difficult part would be to extract that filename out of the HTTP request string: nothing that a Bash script cannot easily do!