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Search results for Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel

Debian OpenVZ On Debian Etch For Webservers
Post date: December 26, 2006, 15:12 Category: System Views: 1015 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Virtualization is a good practice for servers, since it makes things more secure, scalable, replacable, and replicable, all this at the cost of little added complexity. This guide was written during an install of a Supermicro machine with two dual-core opterons (64-bit), two identical disks (for RAID) and a load of memory. Why OpenVZ and not XEN or the recent KVM kernel module? Well, XEN is not very stable for 64-bit architectures (yet), and it comes with quite a bit of overhead (every VM runs its own kernel) due to its complexity. KVM is very simple but restricts you to run a kernel as one process, so the VM cannot benefit from multi core systems.
Debian Managing Xen With Xen-Tools, Xen-Shell, And Argo
Post date: November 5, 2006, 15:11 Category: System Views: 1785 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This guide describes how to install and use xen-tools, xen-shell, and Argo on a Debian system. All three packages provide useful tools for the administration of virtual Xen machines. Xen-tools is a collection of Perl scripts that allow you to easily create, update, and delete Xen guest domains. The xen-shell provides a command-line interface to owners of Xen domains so that they can manage their Xen domains without the help of the server administrator. And with Argo, you can control Xen domains through a web interface or through a menu on the command line.
Debian Debian Kernel Compile Howto (Kernel 2.6)
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: System Views: 1485 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In some cases you might want to compile your own kernel that suits your needs better than the standard kernel that comes with your distribution. I will describe how to do this on a Debian machine. Please note that this tutorial is for kernel 2.6 only!
Debian The Perfect Xen 3.0.3 Setup For Debian Sarge
Post date: October 22, 2006, 14:10 Category: Emulation Views: 2120 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions about how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system. It shows how to compile Xen, dom0 and domU kernels from the sources as well as how to install Xen from precompiled binaries. Creating guest domains from images is also covered by this article.
Fedora How To Run Fully-Virtualized Guests (HVM) With Xen 3.2 On Debian Lenny (x86_64)
Post date: March 8, 2009, 08:03 Category: Installing Views: 906 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up fully-virtualized guests (HVM) with Xen 3.2 on a Debian Lenny x86_64 host system. HVM stands for HardwareVirtualMachine; to set up such guests, you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization (Intel VT or AMD-V). Hardware virtualization allows you to install unmodified guest systems (in contrast to paravirtualization where the guest kernel needs to be modified); that way you cannot only virtualize OpenSource operating systems like Linux and BSD, but also closed-source operating systems like Windows where you cannot modify the kernel.
Debian Installing And Using OpenVZ On Debian Etch
Post date: May 25, 2008, 04:05 Category: Installing Views: 916 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare a Debian Etch server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernel patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
Debian A Short Introduction To Apt-Pinning
Post date: March 24, 2009, 07:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 651 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This article is a short overview of how to use apt-pinning on Debian and Debian-based distributions (like Ubuntu). Apt-Pinning allows you to use multiple releases (e.g. stable, testing, and unstable) on your system and to specify when to install a package from which release. That way you can run a system based mostly on the stable release, but also install some newer packages from testing or unstable (or third-party repositories).
Debian Installing And Using OpenVZ On Debian Lenny (AMD64)
Post date: March 1, 2009, 06:03 Category: Installing Views: 656 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare a Debian Lenny server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernel patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
OpenBSD Rebuilding the OpenBSD kernel
Post date: April 24, 2005, 15:04 Category: System Views: 1672 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Users who want their OpenBSD machine to perform specific functions or need additional device drivers might want to customize their kernel. In other OS's, like some types of Linux, it is very popular to rebuild the kernel because the default is so bloated. For most users, the default OpenBSD kernel is sufficient; however, you should still apply kernel patches, which will require rebuilding and installing a fresh kernel.
Linux Linux 2.6: Compiling and Installing
Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 926 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: We'll look at the process of compiling and installing a new kernel safely, without overwriting the existing kernel.

You can install as many kernels as you like on a Linux system, and select the one you want to run at boot time. This makes it easy to test different kernels, and different kernel configurations, with particular sets of hardware or applications. The wise network admin always tests new kernels before running them on production machines.