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Search results for Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel

CentOS Installing Xen On CentOS 5.2 (i386)
Post date: November 9, 2008, 06:11 Category: Installing Views: 1965 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.2 system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian Xen Cluster Management With Ganeti On Debian Lenny
Post date: March 3, 2009, 06:03 Category: Installing Views: 800 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Ganeti is a cluster virtualization management system based on Xen. In this tutorial I will explain how to create one virtual Xen machine (called an instance) on a cluster of two physical nodes, and how to manage and failover this instance between the two physical nodes.
Debian Xen Cluster Management With Ganeti On Debian Etch
Post date: September 16, 2007, 16:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1071 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Ganeti is a cluster virtualization management system based on Xen. In this tutorial I will explain how to create one virtual Xen machine (called an instance) on a cluster of two physical nodes, and how to manage and failover this instance between the two physical nodes.
Debian Avoiding slow package updates with package diffs
Post date: September 18, 2006, 08:09 Category: Network Views: 954 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: If you're using the unstable or testing distribution of Debian GNU/Linux you will almost certainly have noticed that apt-get uses daily-diffs for its package updates. In many common situtations this is more bandwidth efficient, however it isn't always appropriate.

apt-get is a standard command which is used by many Debian users to manage package installation, and upgrades. (Although there are also other package managers such as synaptic, or aptitude.)
Debian Installing new Debian systems with debootstrap
Post date: August 12, 2006, 13:08 Category: Installing Views: 1245 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: When it comes to installing new installations of Debian GNU/Linux there is one tool which should not be ignored. Whether you're dealing with a real system, or a virtualised one, the debootstrap tool is ideal for quickly installing new Debian environments.

Put simply the debootstrap package allows you to install a fresh copy of Debian GNU/Linux into a directory. This new installation will have all the basic packages and binaries which you'd expect to be present
OpenSUSE Write your own kernel module and insert it into running kernel
Post date: January 12, 2009, 02:01 Category: Programming Views: 670 Comments: 1
Tutorial quote: So, you want to write a kernel module. You know C, you've written a few normal programs to run as processes, and now you want to get to where the real action is, to where a single wild pointer can wipe out your file system and a core dump means a reboot.

kernel Modules are pieces of code that can be loaded and unloaded into the kernel upon demand. They extend the functionality of the kernel without the need to reboot the system. For example, one type of module is the device driver, which allows the kernel to access hardware connected to the system.
Fedora Installing And Using OpenVZ On Fedora 9
Post date: July 20, 2008, 04:07 Category: Installing Views: 928 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare a Fedora 9 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernel patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
CentOS Installing And Using OpenVZ On CentOS 5.2
Post date: July 31, 2008, 06:07 Category: Installing Views: 1807 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare a CentOS 5.2 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernel patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
Ubuntu Installing And Using OpenVZ On Ubuntu 8.10
Post date: November 11, 2008, 05:11 Category: Installing Views: 1134 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare an Ubuntu 8.10 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernel patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
Ubuntu Installing Xen On An Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Server From The Ubuntu Repositories
Post date: June 29, 2007, 19:06 Category: Installing Views: 1301 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Ubuntu 7.04) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files or compilation are needed. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).