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Search results for Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel

Fedora Xen With Graphical User Interface On A Fedora 7 Desktop
Post date: September 18, 2007, 17:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1082 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up Xen on Fedora 7. Xen enables the paravirtualization of your hardware for its virtual machines if you have a CPU with Vanderpool (Intel) or Pacifica (AMD) technology. The paravirtualization provides high performance to your virtual machines. Fedora's virt-manager provides an easy to use GUI for setting up and managing your virtual machines. It does not have the extensive features like VMware Server, but the basics are in place.
CentOS Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.3 (x86_64)
Post date: May 17, 2009, 08:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1597 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.3 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian Giving your Xen instances a working X setup
Post date: January 2, 2006, 22:01 Category: Software Views: 863 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Xen, the virtualisation system, is a great tool for running fresh copies of an operating system. However it doesn't allow you to run X11 programs. Here we can fix that with the help of VNC.
FreeBSD Installing ProFTPD
Post date: August 26, 2005, 08:08 Category: Network Views: 1291 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This document is about replacing the standard ftpd from the FreeBSD kernel with the fancier ProFTPd.
Linux Benchmarking Filesystems Part II
Post date: January 6, 2006, 16:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2548 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
Linux Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 2
Post date: January 21, 2006, 00:01 Category: System Views: 1153 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: We ended last time after configuring our first unprivileged Xen domain. In this article, we complete our cluster and then test it using an open-source parallel ray tracer. The first thing we need to do is create additional slave nodes to be used with the cluster. So, let's get down to business.
Debian Creating a Wiki with kwiki
Post date: December 17, 2005, 16:12 Category: Software Views: 846 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Debian Installing Debian Etch From A Windows System With
Post date: September 27, 2007, 05:09 Category: Installing Views: 1150 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Debian-Installer Loader is a Debian Etch installer for Windows which adds an entry to the boot menu that allows you to start the Debian installation. Unlike the Ubuntu installation with Wubi, real Debian partitions are created during the installation. In the end, you have a dual-boot system (Windows/Debian).
Debian Full Mail Server Solution With Virtual Domains & Users (Debian Etch, Postfix, MySQL, DoveCot, DSpam, ClamAV, Postgrey, RBL)
Post date: October 31, 2007, 04:10 Category: Installing Views: 1552 Comments: 1
Tutorial quote: This guide describes how to set up a full email solution in Debian Linux (all code is from Debian Etch). I was asked to design a secure, scalable, portable solution for a small company. While the guide references many servers, the company only had 4 physical machines, Xen was used to virtualize the entire solution. That particular aspect of the system is not discussed in this guide, although I will try to get it into the next revision.
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 17:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3049 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.