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Search results for Installing and securing Squid

Unix+clones Installing and securing Squid
Post date: March 13, 2006, 10:03 Category: Software Views: 67
Tutorial quote: Squid is a high-performance proxy caching server for web clients, supporting FTP, gopher, and HTTP data objects. Unlike traditional caching software, Squid handles all requests in a single, non-blocking, I/O-driven process. Squid keeps meta data and especially hot objects cached in RAM, caches DNS lookups, supports non-blocking DNS lookups, and implements negative caching of failed requests. Squid supports SSL, extensive access controls, and full request logging. By using the lightweight Internet Cache Protocol, Squid caches can be arranged in a hierarchy or mesh for additional bandwidth savings.

After the installation and base configuration of squid we will add another layer of security by chrooting it.
Linux Linux Web Filtering in 7 steps
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Network Views: 423
Tutorial quote: How to install a transparent Squid proxy server with real-time HTTP virus scanning on Mandrake 10.0 using DansGuardian and ClamAV?

People quickly and easily access volumes of research on the Internet and correspond with a mouse click. For more and more companies, content filtering is part of the large battle to combat all kinds of online threats, including hackers, worms and viruses. Linux content filtering allows administrators to configure and manage Internet access across the entire network and to block unwanted Web content like pornography, shopping Web sites, games and gambling.

This guide contains all the necessary information for installing and understanding the architectural layout of the implementation. It was written with the assumption that you understand how to install programs and have a basic understanding of Linux Mandrake. This includes installing Linux Mandrake and RPM packages, editing files, making directories, compiling software and understanding general UNIX commands. This guide doesn’t explain how to use or configure Squid, DansGuardian and ClamAV but information on where to obtain this information can be found in the “Additional information” section.
OpenBSD Transparent proxying with squid and pf
Post date: May 17, 2005, 04:05 Category: Network Views: 220
Tutorial quote: squid is a caching web proxy, it's set up between web browsers and servers, fetching documents from servers on behalf of browsers. It can accelerate web access by caching frequently requested pages and serving them from its cache. It can also be used to filter pop-up ads and malware or to enforce access control (which clients may request what pages based on different authentication methods).

Traditionally, the proxy is an optional component, and browsers are configured to actively use the proxy. Transparent proxying means forcing all web traffic through the proxy without the cooperation (or knowledge) of the clients. Once all browser connections pass through the proxy, outgoing connections to external hosts can be restricted to the proxy, and direct connections from local clients can be blocked.

The OpenBSD packet filter (pf) can be used to redirect connections based on various criteria, including source and destination addresses and ports. For instance, one can redirect all TCP connections with destination port 80 (HTTP) that arrive through an interface connected to local workstations to a squid proxy running on a different address and port.
Debian Setting up a local web server in Debian Linux
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: Network Views: 41
Tutorial quote: Any web developer, designer, or webmaster can benefit from having a local web server. Even if that developer has no interest in securing and maintaining the server his or her websites live on, a local server can act as a convenient mirror for testing updates, trying new designs, and other general sand-boxing activities.

Web developers whose hosts utilize the popular LAMP platform (Linux + Apache + MySQL + PHP) are frequently hit with a dilemma. Since understanding Linux is not a prerequisite for website administrators, many of them lack the knowledge necessary for setting up a LAMP server from scratch (or at least they may think so). But thanks to the improved package management on Linux distributions like Debian, installing a functional web server is not nearly the chore it was just a couple years ago.
Linux Secure your Server with iptables
Post date: April 20, 2005, 07:04 Category: Security Views: 96
Tutorial quote: Central to securing a Linux server that's connected to the Internet is having a good firewall and specific policies in place. Numerous options exist for those considering firewalls for Linux, however, a free and included solution is onoffer through Netfilter and iptables.
SmoothWall Install SquidGuard on Smoothwall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Software Views: 254
Tutorial quote: squidGuard describes itself as: "An ultrafast and free filter, redirector and access controller for Squid". In my experience, it is the ideal web filter for use with Smoothwall and IpCop since it is lightweight and easy to set up. I use it on an i486, 33Mhz system with 18Mb of Ram and 500Mb of hard drive - and while there is a minor performance hit, the hit is not significant.

This simple how-to describes the steps I took to install squidGuard on my system - it should work for yours too.
FreeBSD Build your own gateway firewall
Post date: April 11, 2006, 17:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 24
Tutorial quote: Learn how to build your own gateway firewall using FreeBSD and old PC parts. The firewall will consist of the PF firewall, Snort IDS, various IPS applications, Squid proxy, and some intuitive web interfaces for auditing. The cost of this project should be between free and $200 depending on your resourcefulness. I built mine for free using spare parts that were stockpiled in personal storage and parts that the USMC was throwing away, but you can build one from used and/or new parts for dirt cheap.
Debian Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel
Post date: December 29, 2005, 02:12 Category: System Views: 91
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
SGI Installing IRIX 6.5 Across a Network
Post date: May 21, 2005, 06:05 Category: Installing Views: 118
Tutorial quote: Installing across a network may be desirable for a number of reasons, usually speed, convenience (disks/CDROM attached to remote system) or necessity. I've done network installs on O2s, Octanes and Indys; in each case, a remote disk file system contained local copies of all the relevant 6.5 media.
Debian Installing Debian onto USB flash media with everything encrypted
Post date: September 28, 2005, 12:09 Category: Security Views: 228
Tutorial quote: This is a simple procedure for installing Debian GNU/Linux onto a USB key flash media. It includes several configuration changes but tries to stay as close to a default debian install as possible.

This is useful for administrators that need to carry sensitive information or people concerned about their privacy.