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Search results for Installling NetBSD: Tales of Rescuing Old Hardware

NetBSD Installling NetBSD: Tales of Rescuing Old Hardware
Post date: May 8, 2005, 21:05 Category: Hardware Views: 2811 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Tutorial explains how to install NetBSD on old Toshiba T2130CS using COM port.
NetBSD Howto install NetBSD 1.6.1 stable on an iBook
Post date: May 1, 2005, 03:05 Category: Installing Views: 2106 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: I've written a howto, how I've installed NetBSD 1.6.1 on Apple iBook and upgraded to NetBSD 1.6.2_RC4.
NetBSD How to install NetBSD from an USB Memory Stick
Post date: December 10, 2007, 04:12 Category: Installing Views: 3291 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This describes how to install NetBSD (i386/amd64) using a Memory Stick instead of a CD-ROM Drive.
FreeBSD Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd
Post date: December 1, 2005, 00:12 Category: Software Views: 1454 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Unix+clones Comparing MySQL performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 1555 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
Unix+clones Xen Disk I/O benchmarking: NetBSD dom0 vs Linux dom0
Post date: April 21, 2005, 10:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 1320 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Xen is a relatively new technology to enable several virtual machines (domU) to run on one computer. The purpose of this article is to determine what operating system (NetBSD or Linux) should be selected as domain 0 (dom0) operating system to get the best performance when running several CPU and disk intensive virtual machines at the same time.
Unix+clones Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 1762 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
NetBSD How to set up a DHCP Server
Post date: June 22, 2006, 21:06 Category: Network Views: 2680 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Setting up a DHCP Server for your Home or Company Network is pretty simple with NetBSD. You don't need to install any Software, because everything you need, is part of the base system.
Debian Rescuing systems using the Debian snapshot server
Post date: September 18, 2006, 14:09 Category: System Views: 3418 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: One of the unofficial Debian project resources which doesn't get the attention it deserves is the Debian Snapshot site. The site contains a mirror of old Debian packages, which can be very useful for system recovery.

In most normal cases you won't ever need to use it, unless you're wanting to compare two different package versions to see changes, or do other non-standard things. However when you do need to use it you'll learn what a big lifesaver it is!

The biggest use for the site, for me, has been for recovering from broken package updates. Whilst these are rare in the Debian Stable and Testing releases they can be an issue when running Debian unstable.
Gentoo Build your own Gentoo rescue LiveCD and USBStick
Post date: June 20, 2005, 04:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2448 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: I've written this how-to after trying to find a boot medium for my home gateway machine which could be used for system rescues and even installing Gentoo. Why not use the standard Gentoo Live CD you ask? Well my gateway machine is one of those small, silent and cool running mini-itx machines (http://www.mini-itx.com) and has no CDROM or floppy drive. I needed some way of getting Gentoo on there and some way of easily rescuing it when the need arises. The good news is that these VIA mini-tix machines are USB bootable and I much preferred the idea of having a little USB drive/stick that I could push into any USB bootable machine and boot into Linux rather than having to set up a PXE networked boot environment (which is also supported).
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