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Search results for Keeping Fedora Up to Date with Yum

Fedora+Core Keeping Fedora Up to Date with Yum
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: System Views: 112
Tutorial quote: Yum is an automatic updater and package management tool for rpm based systems. Yum automatically computes dependencies and figures out what steps need to occur in order to install packages. It makes it much easier to maintain groups of machines without having to manually update each one using rpm.
Ubuntu Essential house keeping in Ubuntu
Post date: December 8, 2005, 06:12 Category: System Views: 184
Tutorial quote: I started using Ubuntu Breezy ver 5.10 a month back on my machine. Prior to that I was exclusively into Fedora. What drew me to Ubuntu was the huge number of packages in its repositories including softwares which I find useful on a day-to-day basis like Tomboy which I had to compile from source in Fedora. But the Ubuntu CD comes with the base packages which support only open file formats. So if you want support for proprietary file formats like mp3 and quicktime support as well as install softwares not included on the CD, then you have to do some work.

I call it essential housekeeping because it is not exactly a problem, but only a matter of finding out how to get the necessary support. Here I share my experiences in putting the Ubuntu house in order on my machine.
FreeBSD Upgrading FreeBSD
Post date: April 1, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 14
Tutorial quote: This document started as a follow up to The Ultimate Multimedia Server Guide and how to go about keeping your server up to date and patched with the latest O/S patches and security patches. The other reason for this document was to try and create an easy to follow update guide for the not so Unix savvy users that visit my website from time to time. My first time trying to upgrade FreeBSD from sources went well but trying to understand and piece together all the other documentation was more of a daunting task than actually upgrading.
SuSe How to set up smart package manager on SUSE LINUX 10.0
Post date: October 29, 2005, 20:10 Category: System Views: 142
Tutorial quote: Quote from the tutorial: The advantage of smartpm is, that, besides the ability to use mirrors it is able to use different repository structures. So I was able to use the apt-repository structure which provides more channels then the actual yum structure [...], and so I was able to build up a package management with update channels which is capable of using and choosing mirrors in a similar way as yum is.
Fedora+Core The Perfect Setup - Fedora Core 5 (64-bit)
Post date: April 13, 2006, 03:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 48
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description how to set up a Fedora Core 5 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.). This tutorial is written for the 64-bit version of Fedora Core 5, but should apply to the 32-bit version with very little modifications as well.
SuSe Setting up yum on SUSE LINUX 10.0
Post date: October 16, 2005, 12:10 Category: System Views: 218
Tutorial quote: Why should I use yum and not yast? Well, yast is nice, but has some disadvantages: It can#t check for gpg keys, you have to trust the mirrors you add. And, speaking about mirrors, yast has no real mirror management for one source. Especially in these times the most and best known SUSE mirrors are very slow or just closed down, so you have to add other sources in yast. But yast needs your clicks when a mirror is not reachable, and if you enter several sources just as mirrors, it checks every single source - that takes quite a long time!
A last reason (which is not important know because SUSE LINUX has a ugly workaround) is that yast is not able to handle packages for different architectures - it can only install packages for one architecture.
RedHat Compile 2.6 kernel for RedHat 9 and 8.0 and get Fedora Updates
Post date: April 12, 2005, 20:04 Category: System Views: 96
Tutorial quote: This tutorial walks you through compiling 2.6 kernel for RedHat 9 and 8.0 and getting Fedora Updates.
Fedora+Core Tripwire on your Fedora Box
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Security Views: 225
Tutorial quote: Tripwire is an Intrusion Detection System. This can be used to alert users whenever their system is compromised. Tripwire detects and reports changes in system files. It will alert you through email whenever a change is detected. If the change is due to normal system activity, you can instruct Tripwire not to report the change to that file in future. If the change is not due to normal system activity, then it is a clear indication that something is wrong and you need to act immediately and fix the issue. Thus tripwire comes very handy to maintain the integrity of the system.

There is lot of information on the web about Tripwire. Some people might argue that AIDE (Advanced Intrusion Detection Environment) is better than tripwire and so on. This comparison is beyond the scope of this article. This is an introductory article for novice users who are interested in installing Tripwire on their Fedora Box. Advanced users can refer to the web for relevant information or they can contact appropriate mailing lists like fedora users mailing list.
Unix+clones Keeping Your Life in Subversion
Post date: October 2, 2005, 12:10 Category: Software Views: 119
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
Gentoo GCC extension for protecting from stack-smashing attacks
Post date: April 20, 2005, 06:04 Category: Security Views: 80
Tutorial quote: The Stack-Smashing Protector (SSP, formerly ProPolice) is perhaps one of the most sophisticated yet simplistic protective compiler technologies to date which makes use of canary values by rearranging local variables and function pointers. When (ssp) is enabled it can prevent many forms of the common return-to-libc attack. It is implemented as a patch to GCC which will automatically insert protection code into your programs at compile time. It is developed by Hiroaki Etoh at IBM.
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