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Mepis Mepis + apt = Working On Easy Street
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: System Views: 103
Tutorial quote: My reasoning for combining the traditional Debian apt command with Mepis was speed and efficiency. Also, in the fine tradition of open source, I could choose to use the command line instead of the Kpackage or Mepis System Center package management screen. This is a good way to learn about Debian systems that builds confidence for new users right off the bat.

Let's see how apt works with Mepis.
Slax Creating a custom live CD with Slax
Post date: June 15, 2005, 12:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 238
Tutorial quote: Live CDs can be useful for testing an operating system or performing special operations -- assuming there's a live CD distro that does what you need. Unfortunately, if you are running a special application, especially one you wrote yourself, no live CD will be tailored exactly to your needs. But creating you own live CD is easier than you might think, with Slax and its easy customization utility MySlax Creator.
SmoothWall Install SquidGuard on Smoothwall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Software Views: 254
Tutorial quote: squidGuard describes itself as: "An ultrafast and free filter, redirector and access controller for Squid". In my experience, it is the ideal web filter for use with Smoothwall and IpCop since it is lightweight and easy to set up. I use it on an i486, 33Mhz system with 18Mb of Ram and 500Mb of hard drive - and while there is a minor performance hit, the hit is not significant.

This simple how-to describes the steps I took to install squidGuard on my system - it should work for yours too.
FreeBSD Upgrading FreeBSD
Post date: April 1, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 14
Tutorial quote: This document started as a follow up to The Ultimate Multimedia Server Guide and how to go about keeping your server up to date and patched with the latest O/S patches and security patches. The other reason for this document was to try and create an easy to follow update guide for the not so Unix savvy users that visit my website from time to time. My first time trying to upgrade FreeBSD from sources went well but trying to understand and piece together all the other documentation was more of a daunting task than actually upgrading.
Debian Installing and Configuring Exim4
Post date: February 25, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 88
Tutorial quote: Installion of Exim4 from the latest Debian GNU/Linux packages is easy. The installation is now based around debconf. If you are upgrading from a simple Exim3 configuration, you can use exim_convert4r4 to convert your configuration file to the new format. If you used the previous version of this guide, which covered Exim3, the conversion should succeed without incident. I intend to discuss configuration via debconf, including setting up local delivery to Maildir format, handling local domain email, and configuring smarthosting for outbound email.
Debian VHCS ISP Control Panel Configuration
Post date: April 6, 2006, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 24
Tutorial quote: VHCS delivers a complete hosting automation appliance by offering significant security, total-cost-of-ownership, and performance advantages over competing commercial solutions.

With VHCS Pro you can configure your server and applications, create user with domains with a few point-and-click operations that take less than a minute. There is no limit to the number of resellers, users and domains that can be created.At the core of VHCS Pro are 3 easy-to-use, Web-based control panels. VHCS provides graphic user interfaces for the administrators, resellers and users
Unix+clones Optimizing C/C++ programs using the GProf profiler
Post date: May 24, 2005, 14:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 69
Tutorial quote: One of the most important things to keep in mind while optimizing an application is: optimize where it counts. It is no use to spend hours optimizing a piece of code that usually runs for only 0.04 seconds anyway.

GProf provides a surprisingly easy way to profile your C/C++ application and spot the interesting pieces right away. A small case study shows how GProf was used to reduce the running time of a real-world application from over 3 minutes to under 5 seconds, by identifying 2 data structures as important and optimizing those.

Historically, the program goes back as far as 1982, when it was introduced on the the SIGPLAN Symposium on Compiler Construction. It is now a standard tool available on virtually all flavors of UNIX.
Solaris Installing Solaris using JumpStart technology on an Intel laptop
Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Installing Views: 97
Tutorial quote: An interesting use of Solaris 8 on a PC laptop is for use with the JumpStart technology. It has never been so easy to install, re-install, or restore a server before.

As I am as a contractor, I am more on the road than in my own office, so I need a laptop, and preferably with Solaris installed, as I am focusing on Sun's products and applications.

Through the years, I have discovered that one of the most common scenarios is that a client needs a server installed, either because they just bought it, or need it re-installed, or recovered.

This article covers how to save time when installing servers, using the JumpStart technology on a laptop with Solaris for Intel.
RedHat My First Linux Server, Part 2
Post date: April 14, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 107
Tutorial quote: A file server is a specialized PC that holds large numbers of files that many people on a network can access. It "serves up" files to everyone instead of each person having files on his or her own PC. The good news is that you don't have to be a network guru to set up a basic file server. If you followed the Easy Linux Install steps in Part 1, you are ready to set up a Linux PC as a file server.

While there are many ways to set up a network and a server, this article concentrates on the simplest approaches with the highest chance of quick success.
Debian Creating a Wiki with kwiki
Post date: December 17, 2005, 17:12 Category: Software Views: 52
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.