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Linux Automating the Login Script
Post date: April 17, 2005, 06:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 52
Tutorial quote: In a perfect world, you could spend a few weeks creating a system and the result would be a system that never required manual maintenance or modifications. Whether this ideal will ever be achieved is debatable, but it definitely won't happen in the near future. In the meantime, we still have to do things manually, even if only once in a while. When I must do things manually, I'm not usually happy about it. In fact, it usually means that there has been an emergency, so other people aren't happy about it either. In times like this, it is nice to have a consistent and efficient user interface on every machine. The information and examples presented in this article assume that you are using the bash shell. However, you can modify all of the scripts so that they work in other shells. In some cases, they might even work unmodified (like in the standard Bourne Shell [sh]). Other shells will also work, but they might have different methods for changing the prompt and creating command aliases. The principles in this article should be relatively easy to adapt to the shell of your choice.
Linux NFS over CIPE-VPN tunnels
Post date: May 23, 2005, 12:05 Category: Network Views: 60
Tutorial quote: The Network File System (NFS) is a standard protocol for sharing file services with Linux and Unix computers. It is a distributed file system that enables local access to remote disks and file systems and is based on the client\server architecture. Although easy to configure, it is typically used only to transfer data over an intranet or LAN because of its transparency and security potholes when exposed to the risks of the Internet. However, it still can be employed -- without compromising security -- to share files over the Internet by configuring it to run on a Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. This article will show you how to set up NFS to run over a CIPE-VPN connection between two Linux systems.
Linux HOWTO build a LiveCD from scratch
Post date: December 31, 2005, 21:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 147
Tutorial quote: This mini-HowTo will show you how to create your own LiveCD.
Gentoo VHCS2 on Gentoo HowTo
Post date: April 20, 2005, 09:04 Category: Installing Views: 102
Tutorial quote: Want to build web hosting service on top of Gentoo? Well now you can with VHCS2 (Virtual Hosting Control System).
FreeBSD Building a FreeBSD Build System
Post date: April 14, 2006, 20:04 Category: System Views: 24
Tutorial quote: When you finish this article, you will have an unbeatable update system. Even mergemaster will work faster. You will have an update system in which a machine update/upgrade will take less than 10 minutes.
Unix+clones Learn REXX fast
Post date: August 31, 2005, 21:08 Category: Programming Views: 114
Tutorial quote: If you’ve programmed under IBM operating systems, you’ve undoubtedly heard of Rexx. Rexx is the scripting and command language IBM bundles with all its mainframe, mid-range, and lower-end operating systems. What you might not be aware of is that Rexx also runs on almost every other operating system in the known universe. You can download Rexx free for all versions of Windows®, Linux, UNIX®, BSD, Mac OS, and DOS, and many other systems. It even runs on the three major operating systems for handheld devices: Windows CE, Palm OS, and Symbian/EPOC32.

What this means is, if you learn Rexx, you’ll know a scripting language that runs everywhere from mainframes to handhelds—and everything in between. Rexx is a general-purpose language that's powerful enough for mainframes yet flexible enough for other platforms. Best of all, Rexx is easy to learn.
Linux The Serial Console
Post date: April 14, 2005, 09:04 Category: Hardware Views: 71
Tutorial quote: In these modern times, a hardworking admin might be tempted to turn her back on the Old Ways, and indulge in increasingly exotic methods of interfacing with servers: SSH over ethernet, USB, Firewire, wireless, infrared, KVM switches, VNC, VPN... next stop: direct neural implants.

There's one old timer that still has useful place in the admin's tool kit: the serial console. Sure, it's slow and funky. But there are times it can be a real lifesaver. When nothing else works, it's a direct pipeline into your system. It's simple and cheap. You don't need to install drivers or expansion cards, it's just there.

Administration via serial console is common in data centers. Just imagine the nightmare of trying to connect all those rack units to keyboards and displays. The cabling can be extended to a nice comfortable ops center (well, an ops center, anyway). (This Lantronix Console Manager is an example of the type of device used to administer these.)

There are a number of ways to make the physical connection. You can connect an external modem--the kind us old timers fondly refer to as "real" modems--and do remote administration via dialup. It couldn't be any simpler, just dial direct. Or grab a null modem cable, connect to a laptop or a nearby workstation, and you have an instant terminal.
Fedora+Core Building a Linux cluster on a budget
Post date: November 18, 2005, 14:11 Category: Network Views: 140
Tutorial quote: So you need a lot of computing power but don't want to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a commercial cluster? Or maybe you just have a lot of machines sitting idle that you would like to put to good use? You can build a powerful and scalable Linux cluster using only free software and off-the-shelf components. Here's how.
FreeBSD Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD
Post date: November 28, 2005, 22:11 Category: System Views: 104
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?


Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution. While tutorials on gmirror exist, I found them to require either manual calculations of partition sizes with bsdlabel or the use of a fix-it floppy on an existing system.

It made more sense to me to configure RAID during the install of the operating system. I also wanted a procedure that was easy to follow and didn't introduce human error in the form of a math miscalculation. After cobbling together the available documentation and experimenting my way through various configurations, I came across a procedure that has worked well for me on several different systems. I also received valuable feedback from Pawel Jakub Dawidek, the author of gmirror, who gave some insight into some of the not yet documented features of gmirror.
Linux Build a Home Terabyte Backup System Using Linux
Post date: November 30, 2005, 20:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 84
Tutorial quote: A terabyte-plus backup and storage system is now an affordable option for Linux users. This article discusses options for building and configuring an inexpensive, expandable, Linux-based backup server.