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Search results for Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd

FreeBSD Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd
Post date: November 30, 2005, 19:11 Category: Software Views: 79
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
OpenBSD Apache - Serving up the Web
Post date: April 11, 2006, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 19
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.
SmoothWall Install SquidGuard on Smoothwall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Software Views: 254
Tutorial quote: squidGuard describes itself as: "An ultrafast and free filter, redirector and access controller for Squid". In my experience, it is the ideal web filter for use with Smoothwall and IpCop since it is lightweight and easy to set up. I use it on an i486, 33Mhz system with 18Mb of Ram and 500Mb of hard drive - and while there is a minor performance hit, the hit is not significant.

This simple how-to describes the steps I took to install squidGuard on my system - it should work for yours too.
Unix+clones DNS name serving through NSD
Post date: July 5, 2005, 02:07 Category: Network Views: 79
Tutorial quote: Given the sheer importance of name servers in providing Domain Name System (DNS) resolution -- a process used by every Web-facing application to translate domain names into IP addresses and vice versa -- not many people put much thought into the available software alternatives for pulling off this feat. One compelling application is NSD, an alternative to the widely deployed BIND name server.
OpenBSD Transparent proxying with squid and pf
Post date: May 17, 2005, 04:05 Category: Network Views: 220
Tutorial quote: squid is a caching web proxy, it's set up between web browsers and servers, fetching documents from servers on behalf of browsers. It can accelerate web access by caching frequently requested pages and serving them from its cache. It can also be used to filter pop-up ads and malware or to enforce access control (which clients may request what pages based on different authentication methods).

Traditionally, the proxy is an optional component, and browsers are configured to actively use the proxy. Transparent proxying means forcing all web traffic through the proxy without the cooperation (or knowledge) of the clients. Once all browser connections pass through the proxy, outgoing connections to external hosts can be restricted to the proxy, and direct connections from local clients can be blocked.

The OpenBSD packet filter (pf) can be used to redirect connections based on various criteria, including source and destination addresses and ports. For instance, one can redirect all TCP connections with destination port 80 (HTTP) that arrive through an interface connected to local workstations to a squid proxy running on a different address and port.
Unix+clones Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance
Post date: February 12, 2006, 04:02 Category: Optimizing Views: 37
Tutorial quote: Apache is an open-source HTTP server implementation. It is the most popular web server on the Internet; the December 2005 Web Server Survey conducted by Netcraft [1] shows that about 70% of the web sites on Internet are using Apache.

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU, etc. But most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on Linux systems. Of course, it is assumed that there is enough hardware resources - especially enough RAM that the server isn't swapping frequently. First two sections look into various Compile-Time and Run-Time configuration options. The Run-Time section assumes that Apache is compiled with prefork MPM. HTTP compression and caching is discussed next. Finally, using separate servers for serving static and dynamic contents is covered. Basic knowledge of compiling and configuring Apache and Linux are assumed.
Unix+clones Installing and securing Squid
Post date: March 13, 2006, 10:03 Category: Software Views: 67
Tutorial quote: Squid is a high-performance proxy caching server for web clients, supporting FTP, gopher, and HTTP data objects. Unlike traditional caching software, Squid handles all requests in a single, non-blocking, I/O-driven process. Squid keeps meta data and especially hot objects cached in RAM, caches DNS lookups, supports non-blocking DNS lookups, and implements negative caching of failed requests. Squid supports SSL, extensive access controls, and full request logging. By using the lightweight Internet Cache Protocol, Squid caches can be arranged in a hierarchy or mesh for additional bandwidth savings.

After the installation and base configuration of squid we will add another layer of security by chrooting it.
Unix+clones How-To: Stream almost anything using VLC
Post date: November 29, 2005, 15:11 Category: Software Views: 76
Tutorial quote: The VLC media player is an amazing piece of software. In its most basic form it is a lightweight media player that can play almost any audio or video format you throw at it. VLC is also multiplatform in the most extreme sense of the word; it can run on Windows, OSX, Linux and PocketPC / WinCE handhelds along with other systems. VLC works great as a streaming server and video transcoder too.
Solaris Configuring Sendmail
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 89
Tutorial quote: Sendmail has the reputation of having the most hideous configuration file in the history of mankind. It's extremely long and incredibly cryptic. However, it is this very complexity that has made it the most popular MTA (Mail Transport Agent) on the Internet. Its' flexibility allows sendmail to handle the most demanding, disjointed mail routing and serving configurations you can dream up.
OSX A Windows Administrator's Guide to Serving Macs
Post date: December 13, 2005, 06:12 Category: Network Views: 45
Tutorial quote: Are you Mac-savvy? Many Windows administrators and technicians have never had to support Macs on their networks, so the idea of suddenly having a handful of Mac workstations might seem really challenging. Ryan Faas gives you a simple guide to supporting Mac workstations and Mac users within your Windows network.