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Linux Linux Filesystems and Partitioning: A Primer
Post date: June 24, 2005, 10:06 Category: System Views: 87
Tutorial quote: We recently to shed some light on Linux, particularly for users unfamiliar with the system. The article received quite a response from around the world and so we will be doing some follow-up articles to teach all those interested, the ins and outs of Linux. In this article, we will be discussing what partitioning is, how to choose a filesystem, how to have Windows and Linux installed on your hard drive at the same time, and more.
Linux Optimizing Linux filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 118
Tutorial quote: Last time we introduced a few common Linux filesystems and examined their features. If you've already installed Linux, your partitions are already set up and configured with particular filesystems, but you may decide you want to modify this configuration. What's the best way to begin?
Linux Benchmarking Maildir Delivery on Linux Filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 65
Tutorial quote: The goal of this set of benchmarks is to determine which of the leading Linux filesystems (ext2, ext3, ReiserFS, and XFS) offer the best performance when used for accepting maildir deliveries. The resulting system should be a good balance of delivery and retrieval performance under potentially high concurrent filesystem load.
Debian Filesystems (ext3, reiser, xfs, jfs) comparison on Debian Etch
Post date: April 23, 2006, 04:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 16
Tutorial quote: There are a lot of Linux filesystems comparisons available but most of them are anecdotal, based on artificial tasks or completed under older kernels. This benchmark essay is based on 11 real-world tasks appropriate for a file server with older generation hardware (Pentium II/III, EIDE hard-drive).
Linux Inkscape: Vector Graphics For Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 22:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 71
Tutorial quote: In this story we'll do a quick primer on how you can get up to speed on Inkscape. Along the way, we'll explore situations where a vector based graphic would be better suited for a job than a raster based picture. In spite of not being an XML or web development expert I think SVG will be important in the future. Read on and you'll see why.
Gentoo EVMS Howto for Gentoo Linux
Post date: April 15, 2005, 00:04 Category: Hardware Views: 453
Tutorial quote: EVMS stands for Enterprise Volume Management System. It's a all-in-one utility written by IBM to manage disk partitions, logical volumes, software RAID and even filesystems.

It does everything from installing the partition table to mounting volumes, fscking and resizing them. It has a plugin mechanism which allow a user to extend EVMS with external drivers.
Debian An apt-get primer
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: System Views: 90
Tutorial quote: If any single program defines the Debian Linux project, that program is apt-get. apt-get is Debian's main tool for installing and removing software. Working with the .deb package format, apt-get offers sophisticated package management that few Red Hat Package Manager RPM-based distributions can match.

Besides the convenience, an advantage of apt-get is that it reduces the chances of falling into dependency hell, that limbo where software installation fails for lack of another piece of software, whose installation fails for lack of another piece of software, and so on. If you know how Debian's archive system works, and how to choose the sources that apt-get uses, and use a few precautions in your upgrades, then the chances are that dependency problems will never bedevil you. Should you descend into dependency hell anyway, apt-get offers useful tools for climbing out of it.
Debian Debian RAID 1/5 system installer
Post date: May 28, 2005, 18:05 Category: Installing Views: 193
Tutorial quote: Instructions for installing a very clean Debian GNU/Linux system that boots from RAID 1, and has RAID 1 or RAID 5 root and data filesystems.

The examples assume two identical harddrives, sda and sdb, on which after a small boot partition, 1 GB is used for swap, 25 GB is used for the root filesystem and everything else is for a big "data" partition that will hold non-system stuff.
BSD Managing Filesystems : fstab
Post date: April 15, 2005, 19:04 Category: System Views: 87
Tutorial quote: Understanding how the BSD filesystem manages disk space is critical to successfully managing a BSD server or workstation. However, this topic is generally overlooked since it is rarely used outside of installation and upgrades. It is also a very simple topic and most people assume you understand how it all works.

This article gives a quick synopsis on filesystem layout and tries to briefly explain how to understand /etc/fstab. The fstab(5) man pages, while good, do little to teach the basics to new sysadmins.
Linux Benchmarking Filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 95
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.