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Search results for Linux stateful firewall design

Linux Linux stateful firewall design
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
OpenBSD Failover Firewalls with OpenBSD and CARP
Post date: April 27, 2005, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 231
Tutorial quote: Firewalls are a required component in commercial and residential computer networks. For many installations, the firewall is a single point of failure between client systems and external resources. It can also become a liability when hardware or applications fail, leaving potential customers unable to reach your servers. A properly designed and executed failover configuration for your primary firewall will address many of these concerns. This article introduces a proven method for installing redundant stateful firewalls using native OpenBSD features.
Linux Roll Your Own Firewall
Post date: March 28, 2006, 16:03 Category: Network Views: 9
Tutorial quote: A comprehensive user friendly guide to setting up your own firewall on GNU/Linux.
Linux iptables: The Linux Firewall Administration Program
Post date: November 29, 2005, 15:11 Category: Network Views: 86
Tutorial quote: This chapter covers the iptables firewall administration program used to build a Netfilter firewall. For those of you who are familiar with or accustomed to the older ipfwadm and ipchains programs used with the IPFW technology, iptables will look very similar to those programs. However, it is much more feature-rich and flexible, and it is very different on subtle levels.
FreeBSD Build your own gateway firewall
Post date: April 11, 2006, 17:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 24
Tutorial quote: Learn how to build your own gateway firewall using FreeBSD and old PC parts. The firewall will consist of the PF firewall, Snort IDS, various IPS applications, Squid proxy, and some intuitive web interfaces for auditing. The cost of this project should be between free and $200 depending on your resourcefulness. I built mine for free using spare parts that were stockpiled in personal storage and parts that the USMC was throwing away, but you can build one from used and/or new parts for dirt cheap.
Unix+clones Developing GNOME Applications with Java
Post date: May 27, 2005, 20:05 Category: Programming Views: 88
Tutorial quote: Design your application's GUI look in XML, write the code in Java and plug the whole thing in to the GNOME desktop.
Linux Port Knocking
Post date: April 16, 2005, 06:04 Category: Network Views: 38
Tutorial quote: Firewall administrators are challenged to balance flexibility and security when designing a comprehensive rule set. A firewall should provide protection against malfeasants, while allowing trusted users to connect. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to filter out the bad guys, because filtering on the basis of IP addresses and ports does not distinguish connecting users. Bad guys can and do come from trusted IP addresses. Open ports remain a necessary vulnerability: they allow connections to applications but also may turn into open doors for attack. This article presents a new security system, termed port knocking, in which trusted users manipulate firewall rules by transmitting information across closed ports.
Linux Three tools to help you configure iptables
Post date: May 25, 2005, 10:05 Category: Network Views: 90
Tutorial quote: Every user whose client connects to the Internet should configure his firewall immediately after installation. Some Linux distributions include firewall configuration as a part of installation, often offering a set of defaults configurations to choose from. However, to ensure that your machine presents the minimum "attack surface" (a measure of the number of vulnerable ports, user accounts, and sockets exposed to attack) to the predatory inhabitants of the Internet, you may need to do some manual configuration of your firewall. Here are three tools that can help.
The Linux kernel (version 2.4 onwards) contains a framework for packet filtering and firewalling using netfilter and iptables. Netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. Iptables is a generic table structure for the definition of rulesets. Each rule within an IP table consists of a number of classifiers (iptables matches) and one connected action (iptables target). Iptables has extensive documentation that can be accessed online or by typing man iptables at the command line. Yet despite the depth of the documentation available for iptables, its complexity can be baffling.
Debian Ruby on Rails on Debian
Post date: January 10, 2006, 12:01 Category: Network Views: 65
Tutorial quote: Most of you have probably heard of Ruby on Rails and may be wondering what exactly it does and how you can try it for yourself. Put simply, Rails is a web application framework that uses the model-view-controller software design pattern to allow for rapid development of web applications. This article will cover how to install Rails on Debian and how to configure it to work with Apache and a relational database of your choice.
Linux Secure your Server with iptables
Post date: April 20, 2005, 07:04 Category: Security Views: 96
Tutorial quote: Central to securing a Linux server that's connected to the Internet is having a good firewall and specific policies in place. Numerous options exist for those considering firewalls for Linux, however, a free and included solution is onoffer through Netfilter and iptables.