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Search results for Make Your Linux Desktop Look Like A Mac - Mac4Lin Project Documentation

Linux Make Your Linux Desktop Look Like A Mac - Mac4Lin Project Documentation
Post date: October 30, 2007, 06:10 Category: Desktop Views: 1853 Comments: 1
Tutorial quote: Do you want to give your desktop a dash of Mac OS X? The goal of this project is to bring the look and feel of Mac OS X (latest being 10.5, Leopard) to *nix GTK based systems. This document will present the procedure to install Mac4Lin pack & tweak certain things to get that almost perfect Mac OS X like desktop.
OSX A mini-guide to Mac OS X for new Mini owners
Post date: April 12, 2005, 12:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1136 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: One thing the Mac mini does not have is a comprehensive “welcome to OS X” guide. Printed documentation included with the mini is scanty — primarily EULA and warranty information, and Apple has never been one for flashy tutorials. That’s why we at Ars have pulled together a short list of things every newcomer to Mac OS X needs to know.

This guide is not intended to be comprehensive and answer every conceivable question Windows and Linux users will have about their new platform. What it does intend to do is give you the lowdown on some basic things: window management, accessing your Windows box from the Mac, and application behavior.
FreeBSD How I created my own .mac replacement
Post date: February 7, 2006, 15:02 Category: Network Views: 1305 Comments: 1
Tutorial quote: My .mac subscription is 60 days from renewal so I have to ask myself, "how useful is .mac to me?

Is .mac worth it to me? Many of the reasons I don't find .mac useful are the same reasons I encourage others to use .mac. One has to keep in mind that I'm not an "average" computer user. My needs are different and Apple wouldn't make any money trying to sell a .mac like service to guys like me. This is not an "I hate .mac" site but rather an explanation of the motivation and methods I used to provide myself with comparable services that are more usable to me. I publish it so that others may benefit from what I have learned.

This is published to help others, but don't expect free support from the author. Support requests that arrive without monetary compensation for my time will almost certainly be ignored. Instead, try using the support forums and maybe someone will help you out.

To understand why I did this, you might want to read about my use of .mac services.

Project Goals:

Retain the useful features: Regardless of whether or not I renew my subscription, I want to retain the features I have found most useful (iDisk, iSync (between computers), iCal sharing, and Backup).

Enhance the useful features: Simply retaining the useful features would be an utter failure. The most value can be found in addressing the shortcomings of each feature. For iDisk, speed and disk space are the impediments to it's usefulness. iSync already works quite well. iCal sharing works well but publish and subscribe updates are sloooow. Backup is hamstrung by the iDisk space issue.
Linux What's up, Doc? A guide to Linux Documentation
Post date: January 6, 2007, 15:01 Category: System Views: 941 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: If you're new to Linux, you've probably been told to read the manual, but what good is that advice if you don't know where the manuals are or how to use them? Here, in one place, is complate instructions on how to find and navigate the common Linux documentation systems, including man, info, READMEs, HOWTOs, HTML, PDF/PS, DocBook, Gnome and KDE help system, and command-line option conventions. The guide I wish I'd had when I was new to Linux!
SuSe Xgl on SUSE 10.1 for Gnome and KDE with NVidia Graphics Cards
Post date: May 12, 2006, 08:05 Category: Desktop Views: 2000 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Perhaps the most interesting eye-candy introduced to a mainstream Linux distribution is that of the Xgl 3D desktop environment. Naturally, when seen, it fosters the thought, "How can I do that on my own desktop?" I'll be honest with you, it's not quite as point-and-click as some of the other desktop niceties that we've discussed in the past, such as gdesklets or the gkrellm monitors. That in mind, if you're interested in getting Xgl installed and running on your desktop, you've found the right place. We'll take it a bit at a time and make sure we get you set up. First of all, I need to make sure that you are using this tutorial for a machine running either SUSE Linux 10.1 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10, and that you have an NVidia video card. With that, let's get going.
Yellow+Dog Installing Linux on the Mac mini
Post date: May 11, 2005, 07:05 Category: Installing Views: 2121 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
OSX A Windows Administrator's Guide to Serving Macs
Post date: December 13, 2005, 05:12 Category: Network Views: 1690 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Are you Mac-savvy? Many Windows administrators and technicians have never had to support Macs on their networks, so the idea of suddenly having a handful of Mac workstations might seem really challenging. Ryan Faas gives you a simple guide to supporting Mac workstations and Mac users within your Windows network.
Gentoo Fbsplash on gentoo
Post date: April 12, 2005, 00:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 1342 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Gensplash is a project started by Spock whose aim is to create a set of tools which could enrich the Gentoo boot process by displaying messages, animations, progress bars, etc. An explanation of the various things named *splash (bootsplash, gensplash, fbsplash, and splashutils) and how they relate to each other, can be found at Spock's Gensplash site.

Fbsplash is part of the gensplash project. According to fbsplash's documentation, "the framebuffer splash is a kernel feature that allows displaying a background picture on selected consoles and switching the first console to the so-called silent mode, while booting/rebooting/shutting down the system." The fbsplash device is accessed through the /dev/fbsplash device node. For fbsplash to work, a frame buffer device is required.
Fedora+Core Fedora Core 6, making the Linux desktop for your parents (or the Linux desktop that does it all)
Post date: January 27, 2007, 01:01 Category: Desktop Views: 2379 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: A tutorial including a script that will configure and download all necessary components to make Fedora Core a multimedia rich Desktop and also ready for "normal" people. Explanations about what each line does are included, as well as screenshots. PDF and TXT's are also available.

It is a walkthrough of steps to take and explains what they do.
Linux Grub From the Ground Up
Post date: April 12, 2005, 12:04 Category: Software Views: 931 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Grub is a world-class boot loader with insufficient documentation. In many ways it blows the doors of LILO. For instance, it's MUCH easier to use Knoppix to rebuild a grub boot loader than to rebuild a LILO boot loader. However, until you're comfortable with grub, it might seem just the opposite. All too often grub dumps you at a grub> prompt with no hint of what you should do. You might have heard that a successful reboot is just three commands away, but which commands? The state of grub's documentation is such that you can't figure it out unless you already know grub.

That catch 22 is the very purpose of this document. This document will to give you enough grub expertise that you can create a grub boot floppy on a working machine with grub installed (not necessarily as the bootloader, just installed), and use that floppy to bust back into a Linux machine with a blown bootloader, and then use that floppy to actually install grub as the bootloader.

This document does not discuss using grub to boot or dual boot Windows, mach, BSD, or other non-Linux operating systems. I might write on that subject later. But in the meantime, once you're familiar with the principles and practices of grub, given some study of existing documentation you'll probably be able to use grub to boot non-Linux operating systems.