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Search results for Monitoring Services using Mon

Debian Monitoring Services using Mon
Post date: April 4, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 16
Tutorial quote: mon is a general-purpose scheduler and alert management tool used for monitoring service availability and triggering alerts upon failure detection. mon was designed to be open and extensible in the sense that it supports arbitrary monitoring facilities and alert methods via a common interface, all of which are easily implemented with programs in C, Perl, shell, etc., SNMP traps, and special mon traps.
Linux Keep an Eye on Your Linux Systems with Netstat
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 39
Tutorial quote: Two of the fundamental aspects of Linux system security and troubleshooting are knowing what services are running, and what connections and services are available. We're all familiar with ps for viewing active services. netstat goes a couple of steps further, and displays all available connections, services, and their status.
Debian Monitoring your bandwidth usage with vnstat
Post date: January 14, 2006, 15:01 Category: Network Views: 73
Tutorial quote: There are many occasions where it is useful to have an idea of your bandwidth usage, perhaps to know when you're going to be charged more by your ISP, or perhaps just as part of general monitoring. The vnstat tool is a simple means of doing just that.
Linux Bandwidth monitoring with iptables
Post date: December 27, 2005, 10:12 Category: Network Views: 63
Tutorial quote: Linux has a number of useful bandwidth monitoring and management programs. A quick search on Freshmeat.net for bandwidth returns a number of applications. However, if all you need is a basic overview of your total bandwidth usage, iptables is all you really need -- and it's already installed if you're using a Linux distribution based on the 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernels.
Debian Running network services as a non-root user
Post date: April 20, 2006, 06:04 Category: Security Views: 14
Tutorial quote: There are many times when it is convenient to allow non-root users to run services, or daemons, which bind to "privileged ports". There are several approaches to this problem each with its own set of pros and cons. Read on for a brief look at the most common approaches.
Linux Sawing Linux Logs with Simple Tools
Post date: April 14, 2005, 08:04 Category: Security Views: 37
Tutorial quote: So there you are with all of your Linux servers humming along happily. You have tested, tweaked, and configured until they are performing at their peak of perfection. Users are hardly whining at all. Life is good. You may relax and indulge in some nice, relaxing rounds of TuxKart. After all, you earned it.

Except for one little remaining chore: monitoring your log files. [insert horrible alarming music of your choice here.] You're conscientious, so you know you can't just ignore the logs until there's a problem, especially for public services like Web and mail. Somewhere up in the pointy-haired suites, they may even be plotting to require you to track and analyze all sorts of server statistics.

Not to worry, for there are many ways to implement data reduction, which is what log parsing is all about. You want to slice and dice your logs to present only the data you're interested in viewing. Unless you wish to devote your entire life to manually analyzing log files. Even if you only pay attention to logfiles when you're debugging a problem, having some tools to weed out the noise is helpful.
Debian Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin
Post date: April 4, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 36
Tutorial quote: "Munin" means "memory".

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine "what's different today" when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you're doing capacity wise on all limited resources.

It uses the excellent RRDTool and is written in Perl. Munin has a master/node architecture in which the master connects to all the nodes at regular intervals and asks them for sdata. It then stores the data in RRD files, and (if needed) updates the graphs. One of the main goals has been ease of creating new plugins (graphs).
Gentoo Monitoring all filesystem modifications
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Security Views: 58
Tutorial quote: After loading this kernel module you can monitor all file system alterations by simply typing: cat /dev/fsysmon

It's original purpose was to feed a daemon with data but nevertheless I found it to be even more useful as a standalone project.
Unix+clones Considerations for the system architect: Performance
Post date: April 20, 2005, 06:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 86
Tutorial quote: For many developers and engineers, performance is often an afterthought. But when a product functions as designed and has proven stability and the right feature mix, success in the marketplace often depends upon performance. Architectural decisions define the ultimate feasible performance of any product. In this article, learn how performance-monitoring technology initially developed for mainframes can help you improve your own code's performance.
Debian Monitoring your hardware's temperature
Post date: January 5, 2006, 04:01 Category: Software Views: 90
Tutorial quote: Sometimes it is useful to know the temperature of your hardware, to prevent it from frying. This information can easily be found, if your hardware provides the sensors needed, and we have the necessary software.

Most computers come with temperature sensors, which can be used to prevent your hardware from excessive heat. The most important thing to watch is, of course, your CPU temperature. This is where lm-sensors comes in.