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Search results for My First Linux Server, Part 1

Linux Upstream Provider Woes? Point the Ping of Blame
Post date: April 14, 2005, 08:04 Category: Network Views: 42
Tutorial quote: Your users are complaining that "the Internet is, like, all slow." Users are always complaining, but you're seeing a lot of timeouts when you check mail, surf the Web, or try to log in for remote administration. Or even worse, latency is so bad that you keep getting killed all to heck in your favorite gory violent online multi-player game, so you know there is a problem. But there a lot of potential bottlenecks between your PC and the outside world, like your Internet gateway, proxy server, firewall, Internet service provider, and so forth, so where do you begin?

One of the best and most versatile network tools you can have is a notebook PC running Linux. This lets you plug in anywhere to run tests and find out what is going on. Make it a nothing-to-lose box--don't keep data on it so you can wipe and reinstall the operating system as necessary, because you want to be able to run tests outside of firewalls. Don't run any services. You can put a minimal iptables firewall on it, as there is no point in being totally exposed, but keep it simple. (Use MondoRescue to make a system snapshot for fast restores.)
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 176
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Linux Optimizing Linux filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 118
Tutorial quote: Last time we introduced a few common Linux filesystems and examined their features. If you've already installed Linux, your partitions are already set up and configured with particular filesystems, but you may decide you want to modify this configuration. What's the best way to begin?
Linux DOS Emulation Under Linux
Post date: May 1, 2005, 13:05 Category: Emulation Views: 71
Tutorial quote: Whether you need to run some legacy corporate application, or just want to play some of those old classic DOS games, it's easy to get going.

I've done this on a Slackware 9.1 Linux system with a 2.4.22 kernel, running KDE 3.1.4. The process should be very similar for most reasonably recent Linux distros.
Linux Building a GameCube Linux Kernel
Post date: January 23, 2006, 10:01 Category: System Views: 38
Tutorial quote: This guide explains briefly the necessary steps to produce a Linux kernel suitable for the GameCube, using a Linux PC.
Unix+clones DNS name serving through NSD
Post date: July 5, 2005, 02:07 Category: Network Views: 80
Tutorial quote: Given the sheer importance of name servers in providing Domain Name System (DNS) resolution -- a process used by every Web-facing application to translate domain names into IP addresses and vice versa -- not many people put much thought into the available software alternatives for pulling off this feat. One compelling application is NSD, an alternative to the widely deployed BIND name server.
Unix+clones SSH Port Forwarding Through a Proxy Server
Post date: April 17, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: A common use of SSH is port forwarding (tunneling). This use causes traffic directed to a particular port to be sent to a specified port on another computer. Because traffic is sent through SSH, the traffic is encrypted, allowing the transmission of sensitive data through arbitrary services.
Unix+clones Build Your Own IM Server with Jabber
Post date: June 26, 2005, 18:06 Category: Network Views: 81
Tutorial quote: Instant messaging is a great business communications tool. For example, here at Enterprise Networking Planet the staff and writers all work in their pajamas at home, at far-flung points all over the globe. ENP's crusty editor-with-a-heart-of-gold Perry White lives in a villa in the South of France. I send in my columns from a sailboat currently anchored at Raratonga. Sure, we can exchange emails, but there are times when a live exchange is better.
Debian Splitting updatedb into daily and weekly
Post date: April 21, 2006, 08:04 Category: System Views: 14
Tutorial quote: We all appreciate the locate command when we are such in a hurry we cannot afford a full and in-elegant find. What we like a little less, though, is the updatedb script consuming up all our disk bandwidth at each boot, summoned by anacron.

Of course, this is only the case if you are running a "desktop" machine: since you turn it on when you need to do some work, then you long for a way to shorten the period of reduced usability forced by updatedb.

Inversely, if you run a server that never goes down, and you successfully schedule your updatedb tasks late at night, then this article is not for you.
Debian Centralized Syslog Server Using syslog-NG
Post date: April 28, 2006, 11:04 Category: System Views: 8
Tutorial quote: syslog-ngŠ is the world's most flexible and scalable audit trail processing tool for organizations of any size. It provides a centralised, securely stored log of all devices on your network, whatever platform they run on. And syslog-ng also incorporates a host of powerful features, including filtering based on message content, as well as customisable data mining and analysis capabilities.