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Debian Installing SVN with apache on debian
Post date: March 20, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 36
Tutorial quote: Today I started to set up a SVN repository for our final year project. I tried to setup a SVN server using Apache2 so that the SVN repository is available to the client through the WebDAV/DeltaV protocol. Read on for a trial-and-error introduction.

The Version Control with Subversion book (by Ben Collins-Sussman, Brian W. Fitzpatrick & C. Michael Pilato) was very useful to me when I struggled with SVN. The e-version of the book also available for free.
Unix+clones Providing FTP Services with PureFTPd
Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 39
Tutorial quote: If you work around computers for any length of time you'll probably run into an FTP server. FTP stands for File Transfer Protocol and FTP servers are used to do just that, transfer files. FTP has been around for a long time, much longer than P2P programs, or the World Wide Web, in its day it was the primary method of sharing files with others on the Internet, and it remains very popular even today. This tutorial will cover the installation and setup of an FTP server using PureFTPd.
CentOS The Perfect Setup - CentOS 4.3 (64-bit)
Post date: April 13, 2006, 03:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 51
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description how to set up a CentOS 4.3 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.). This tutorial is written for the 64-bit version of CentOS 4.3, but should apply to the 32-bit version with very little modifications as well.
Debian The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian
Post date: April 1, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 12
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Unix+clones Setup the SSH server to use keys for authentication
Post date: November 16, 2005, 15:11 Category: Network Views: 57
Tutorial quote: The user creates a keypair, which consists of a private key, that can be protected with a passphrase, and a public key. The public key is transfered to the server and the private key is kept in our workstation. We assume that the user has accounts in both the server machine and his workstation. Everytime he tries to connect to the server, the keys are validated and the user is granted access.
OpenBSD Apache - Serving up the Web
Post date: April 11, 2006, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 19
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.
IPCop Setup your own VPN with IPCop and OpenVPN
Post date: March 30, 2006, 12:03 Category: Network Views: 37
Tutorial quote: I ’m a huge fan of IPCop. It’s a great firewall distro that makes administration a snap using a slick web interface. My goal was to use IPCop and an easy-to-use VPN client to allow access to my LAN while away from home.

I ended up going with the ZERINA OpenVPN addon for IPCop and the OpenVPN GUI for Windows.

If you’ve ever wanted full, secure, encrypted access to your LAN from any remote location, here is your guide.

Just follow these ten easy steps…
Fedora+Core The Perfect Setup - Fedora Core 5 (64-bit)
Post date: April 13, 2006, 03:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 48
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description how to set up a Fedora Core 5 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.). This tutorial is written for the 64-bit version of Fedora Core 5, but should apply to the 32-bit version with very little modifications as well.
Unix+clones The 'no-configuration, only-active-when-needed' SSH VPN
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: So, we started thinking about how we might set up a VPN between the application server and our internal software mirror. The only requirement is that the VPN be initiated from the "inside-out" and that the connection is only active for as long as we need to use. In other words, it would only be active during an administration session. Ideally, it wouldn't be a lot of work to setup and tear down either.

SSH to the rescue...

Fortunately, SSH client and server come with support for this out of the box, requiring no additional software to be installed, and no configuration changes. On the server side, sshd, the setting "AllowTcpForwarding" defaults to "yes" unless your sshd_config file explicitly disables it. On the client side, all you have to do is request the forwarding.
Gentoo Enterprise Volume Management System Mini How-To
Post date: April 13, 2005, 16:04 Category: System Views: 205
Tutorial quote: Here is a rough write-up on how I installed Gentoo 1.4_rc1 on EVMS, with the exception of the root partition. If you choose so, see the EVMS Howto for instructions on how to mount your root file system on an EVMS volume. I felt the hassle of dealing with a EVMS (or LVM, for that matter) root outweighs its advantages.

This is a very basic setup I used for my laptop. I only needed it so I don't have to worry about getting the partition sizes right from the beginning and to be able to adjust them with ease in the future. I've been using LVM with success but I couldn't find a way to resize the volume group itself. This, the fact that afaik there is no support for LVM in kernel 2.5.x and a new laptop needing a fresh installation made me try EVMS.