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Unix+clones Keeping Your Life in Subversion
Post date: October 2, 2005, 12:10 Category: Software Views: 119
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
Debian Setting Up A Highly Available NFS Server
Post date: April 1, 2006, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 23
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will describe how to set up a highly available NFS server that can be used as storage solution for other high-availability services like, for example, a cluster of web servers that are being loadbalanced. If you have a web server cluster with two or more nodes that serve the same web site(s), than these nodes must access the same pool of data so that every node serves the same data, no matter if the loadbalancer directs the user to node 1 or node n. This can be achieved with an NFS share on an NFS server that all web server nodes (the NFS clients) can access.

As we do not want the NFS server to become another "Single Point of Failure", we have to make it highly available. In fact, in this tutorial I will create two NFS servers that mirror their data to each other in realtime using DRBD and that monitor each other using heartbeat, and if one NFS server fails, the other takes over silently. To the outside (e.g. the web server nodes) these two NFS servers will appear as a single NFS server.

In this setup I will use Debian Sarge (3.1) for the two NFS servers as well as for the NFS client (which represents a node of the web server cluster).
Linux Linux stateful firewall design
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
RedHat My First Linux Server, Part 1
Post date: April 14, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 100
Tutorial quote: Many small businesses are turning to Linux as way to swim against the tide of rising software costs. Are you thinking about diving into Linux for your small business? From the outside, Linux can appear to be a deep ocean of strange jargon in unchartered waters. Who has the time to wade through all that to save a few clams? With Linux, it's not a sink or swim proposition.

Linux is now a lot simpler than you may think. We can provide you with the easiest, simplest, no-problem process for installing Linux on a PC. After going through this simple installation process, you will have a basic machine that you can configure into any kind of server, workstation, or office desktop. Future articles in this My First Linux Server series will help you build productive, Linux-based servers and small office workstations.

The best choices for your first Linux machine are probably the popular Red Hat Linux or SUSE Linux, primarily because both are easy to install and configure. Additionally, these companies are sound choices for the home office or small business. Both vendors have specialized in Linux for many years and offer full corporate product lines supporting your expansion.
Linux Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 1
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: Hardware Views: 114
Tutorial quote: Wireless hardware for Linux is a moving target. The wireless network adapter that worked fine with Linux yesterday may be released with an unsupported radio chipset today, and with no indication of the change. So buyer beware--always confirm the chipset before you buy. The good news is a lot of wireless adapters have native Linux support, and for those that don't, the NdisWrapper utility lets you use the Windows drivers on your Linux box.
Linux Linux Filesystems and Partitioning: A Primer
Post date: June 24, 2005, 10:06 Category: System Views: 87
Tutorial quote: We recently to shed some light on Linux, particularly for users unfamiliar with the system. The article received quite a response from around the world and so we will be doing some follow-up articles to teach all those interested, the ins and outs of Linux. In this article, we will be discussing what partitioning is, how to choose a filesystem, how to have Windows and Linux installed on your hard drive at the same time, and more.
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 176
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Linux Optimizing Linux filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 118
Tutorial quote: Last time we introduced a few common Linux filesystems and examined their features. If you've already installed Linux, your partitions are already set up and configured with particular filesystems, but you may decide you want to modify this configuration. What's the best way to begin?
Linux DOS Emulation Under Linux
Post date: May 1, 2005, 13:05 Category: Emulation Views: 71
Tutorial quote: Whether you need to run some legacy corporate application, or just want to play some of those old classic DOS games, it's easy to get going.

I've done this on a Slackware 9.1 Linux system with a 2.4.22 kernel, running KDE 3.1.4. The process should be very similar for most reasonably recent Linux distros.
Linux Building a GameCube Linux Kernel
Post date: January 23, 2006, 10:01 Category: System Views: 38
Tutorial quote: This guide explains briefly the necessary steps to produce a Linux kernel suitable for the GameCube, using a Linux PC.