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Search results for Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part III

Debian Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin
Post date: April 4, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 36
Tutorial quote: "Munin" means "memory".

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine "what's different today" when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you're doing capacity wise on all limited resources.

It uses the excellent RRDTool and is written in Perl. Munin has a master/node architecture in which the master connects to all the nodes at regular intervals and asks them for sdata. It then stores the data in RRD files, and (if needed) updates the graphs. One of the main goals has been ease of creating new plugins (graphs).
Linux Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: Hardware Views: 104
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
OSX Enhancing Performance Of Mac OS X
Post date: December 29, 2005, 09:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 61
Tutorial quote: There are certain things that would help Mac OS X perform well and be more responsive (you could say 'snappy'). Here are some ways to eliminate the typical bottlenecks.
Unix+clones Tune and Tweak NFS for Top Performance
Post date: June 25, 2005, 20:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 118
Tutorial quote: As promised in our previous NFS article, we will now explore mount options in a bit more detail. We will also talk about differences between NFS implementations among various UNIX flavors, and the wonderful capability automatic mounting provides.
Linux Feed Your Virus Worries to a Clam
Post date: April 14, 2005, 09:04 Category: Network Views: 56
Tutorial quote: Last week, we looked at how to set up SpamAssassin with Postfix, as part of a lean, mean, spam-killing gateway machine. This week we'll add an anti-virus scanner to our bubbling brew.
Linux Use Webmin for Linux Administration
Post date: April 12, 2005, 20:04 Category: Software Views: 39
Tutorial quote: Administering Linux and Unix-based servers does not need to be the scourge of your work day. With a handy tool called Webmin as part of your arsenal, you can regain complete control of your servers via the Web browser.
Linux Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 2
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: System Views: 59
Tutorial quote: We ended last time after configuring our first unprivileged Xen domain. In this article, we complete our cluster and then test it using an open-source parallel ray tracer. The first thing we need to do is create additional slave nodes to be used with the cluster. So, let's get down to business.
SuSe Installing FreeNX Server on SUSE 10
Post date: December 27, 2005, 10:12 Category: Network Views: 125
Tutorial quote: Not long ago, I reviewed SUSE Linux 10 and found that they had included the latest version of FreeNX (a free version of NoMachine's NX Server) on the installation media. I'd never really tried FreeNX at that point but had heard some good things about it, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Well, once it was installed and working I have to say I was immediately impressed by how simple it was to setup and how well (read: fast) it performed over a WAN connection. I was literally able to get my desktop at home from anywhere else in the world and get near-local speed. Normally, working on a remote system is alright until you need to type in any shape or form. There was almost no delay from the time I'd press a key to the time it would show up on the screen. This is what sold me on FreeNX and prompted me to offer to write a HOWTO on the topic. I was overwhelmed with email from our readers asking that I write it... so here we are!
Linux Building a Linux Cluster, Part 2
Post date: April 17, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 48
Tutorial quote: In this installment, we consider the what of cluster building: the hardware and software components that make up a Linux cluster, and some ways to think about integrating them into a solution for your environment.
Debian Monitoring your bandwidth usage with vnstat
Post date: January 14, 2006, 15:01 Category: Network Views: 73
Tutorial quote: There are many occasions where it is useful to have an idea of your bandwidth usage, perhaps to know when you're going to be charged more by your ISP, or perhaps just as part of general monitoring. The vnstat tool is a simple means of doing just that.