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Search results for Optimizing Mac OS X performance

Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part II
Post date: May 24, 2005, 14:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 135
Tutorial quote: As we discussed in last week's article, for most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. The default workstation that evolved has existed mostly for use by developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. In addition, it performs similar to how many UNIX workstations work, which can seem slow.

In this article, we continue to look at the Linux desktop in a different light. Here, we think of it as a computer system with a fast interface that we can optimize for the knowledge worker and consumer.
OSX The Last iPod Video Guide You’ll Ever Need
Post date: January 10, 2006, 02:01 Category: Multimedia Views: 93
Tutorial quote: I was recently inspired to create a guide for Mac users who just got themselves a brand new iPod! We’ll go over all the options you’ve got and how to convert absolutely anything and everything: DVDs, TiVo video, messy AVIs, muxed MPEGs and more to iPod compatible video - all within OS X. Along the way, you’ll learn a couple of iPod tips and tricks, too. Don’t worry if you don’t know what a muxed MPEG is. We’ll get to that later!
Unix+clones Emulating an OS with qemu
Post date: May 22, 2005, 04:05 Category: Emulation Views: 86
Tutorial quote: When you want to emulate a PC with a complete operating system on your computer, the most heard answer would be VMWare. Sure, for Linux, there is wine, but that package is targeted to handle only window$ and not all programs are supported. No, I'm talking about simulating a complete OS on a virtual PC with virtual hardware.

Although VMware does an almost perfect job at it, it isn't free software. Time to see what the Open Source community has to offer. That's when I stumbled upon qemu. Let's have a look at the possibilities.
Unix+clones Streaming music with SlimServer
Post date: June 15, 2005, 12:06 Category: Network Views: 72
Tutorial quote: Converting your CD collection into MP3 or another digital file format gives you the ability to enjoy the music on your computer and stream it all over the house and the Internet. To do the latter, however, you have to install and configure a streaming server on your computer. That might sound like a daunting task, but there is a streaming server application that makes the whole process pretty painless. SlimServer from Slim Devices is a cross-platform streaming server that runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X and supports a wide range of formats, including AAC, AIFF, FLAC, Ogg Vorbis, MP3, WAV, and WMA. Although it was developed to stream music files to Slim Devices' Squeezebox2 hardware player, it works perfectly with any software MP3 player capable of working with network streams.
Linux Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance
Post date: March 31, 2006, 22:03 Category: Optimizing Views: 14
Tutorial quote: Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU etc. But, most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on the Linux systems.
Unix+clones Comparing MySQL performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 57
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
Debian Boot Debian from an external firewire drive on PowerPc Mac
Post date: December 14, 2005, 14:12 Category: Installing Views: 83
Tutorial quote: Messing with a boot process is a delicate matter even on a Mac. Note that the Debian installer will fail at some point during the procedure.
I offer no warranty and assume no responsibility for whatever loss or damage might be caused to your hardware, software or data.
There are other ways to boot Linux from an external firewire drive documented elsewhere on the net. See the Resources section.

Adding or removing peripherals like usb keys, digital cameras, other external HDs, cdroms etc, or installing/removing devfs, udev, and similar stuff might alter the way Linux sees the firewire drive, i suggest becoming familiar with supplying boot options to yaboot during the boot process. See Man pages of yaboot and yaboot.conf.
Unix+clones Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1
Post date: November 25, 2005, 20:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 46
Tutorial quote: This article provides an overview of the different flags controlling optimization in GCC and some hints on how to use them to get the most performance out of your application. In particular, it discusses some of the new optimization features of the GCC 4.x series included in Fedora™ Core 4 and the upcoming Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® versions.
Unix+clones Postfix performance tuning
Post date: May 21, 2005, 07:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 82
Tutorial quote: Postfix is fast out of the box, but like other packages, you can usually tune it to work even faster. Furthermore, there are situations where Postfix may not perform as well as you expected, whether because of hardware or software limitations on the server system or other adverse conditions, such as a big influx of spam or undeliverable mail. This article shows you how to find and analyze the most common performance problems.
Linux Optimizing Linux filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 118
Tutorial quote: Last time we introduced a few common Linux filesystems and examined their features. If you've already installed Linux, your partitions are already set up and configured with particular filesystems, but you may decide you want to modify this configuration. What's the best way to begin?