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Search results for Panther versus Tiger

OSX Panther versus Tiger
Post date: April 29, 2005, 20:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 106
Tutorial quote: According to Apple, "...unmodified applications that use the system math functions will get an automatic performance boost on the G5..." when switching from Panther to Tiger. We decided to run some tests to see if we got a speed gain right out of the box with applications that we suspect use system math functions.
OSX VNC control of a Mac under OS X 10.4
Post date: December 10, 2005, 03:12 Category: Network Views: 60
Tutorial quote: VNC support is built right into Tiger. This means you can remote control you mac from an another mac a PC or even you Palm or Blackberry.

However the functionality is a bit hidden. Here are the simple steps to set it up. Remember this is TIGER not Panther.
Unix+clones Apple's G5 versus x86, Mac OS X versus Linux
Post date: June 3, 2005, 23:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 117
Tutorial quote: This article is written solely from the frustration that I could not get a clear picture on what the G5 and Mac OS X are capable of. So, be warned; this is not an all-round review. It is definitely the worst buyer’s guide that you can imagine. This article cares about speed, performance, and nothing else! No comments on how well designed the internals are, no elaborate discussions about user friendliness, out-of-the-box experience and other subjective subjects. But we think that you should have a decent insight to where the G5/Mac OS X combination positions itself when compared to the Intel & AMD world at the end of this article.
Linux Benchmarking Filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 95
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.