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Search results for Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1

Unix+clones Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1
Post date: November 25, 2005, 20:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 46
Tutorial quote: This article provides an overview of the different flags controlling optimization in GCC and some hints on how to use them to get the most performance out of your application. In particular, it discusses some of the new optimization features of the GCC 4.x series included in Fedora™ Core 4 and the upcoming Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® versions.
Linux Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER
Post date: May 23, 2005, 12:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 56
Tutorial quote: The Linux on POWER platform offers more than one option to produce binary C/C++ code. In addition to supporting both 32- and 64-bit runtime environments simultaneously, Linux on POWER has two compiler collections. The GNU Compiler Collection, or GCC, is consistent with other Linux implementations with specific exceptions for the POWER architecture. GCC is the leading compiler for portability but also features a number of performance enhancements for optimizing code. The IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on POWER is derived from the high performance compiler for AIX but uses the GNU linker and assembler to create ELF objects that are fully compatible with objects produced by GCC. This document provides side-by-side comparisons of how these two compilers are controlled, overviews of what the compilers are capable of, in terms of optimization, and tips for writing code that is more easily optimized with either of these compilers.
Unix+clones Postfix performance tuning
Post date: May 21, 2005, 07:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 82
Tutorial quote: Postfix is fast out of the box, but like other packages, you can usually tune it to work even faster. Furthermore, there are situations where Postfix may not perform as well as you expected, whether because of hardware or software limitations on the server system or other adverse conditions, such as a big influx of spam or undeliverable mail. This article shows you how to find and analyze the most common performance problems.
Linux Profiling in Linux Performance Tuning
Post date: December 18, 2005, 16:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 78
Tutorial quote: This chapter covers several methods to measure execution time and real-time performance. The methods give different types of granularity, from the program’s complete execution time to how long each function in the program takes.
RedHat Tips & tricks: Performance tuning
Post date: November 25, 2005, 19:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 134
Tutorial quote: Advanced tips on optimizing your Red Hat server.
Gentoo GCC extension for protecting from stack-smashing attacks
Post date: April 20, 2005, 06:04 Category: Security Views: 80
Tutorial quote: The Stack-Smashing Protector (SSP, formerly ProPolice) is perhaps one of the most sophisticated yet simplistic protective compiler technologies to date which makes use of canary values by rearranging local variables and function pointers. When (ssp) is enabled it can prevent many forms of the common return-to-libc attack. It is implemented as a patch to GCC which will automatically insert protection code into your programs at compile time. It is developed by Hiroaki Etoh at IBM.
Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part III
Post date: May 31, 2005, 10:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 144
Tutorial quote: For desktop and laptop users who want a fast-booting operating system, getting rid of services you do not need can appear to improve performance. Obviously, if you are new to Linux, though, you probably do not know which processes you can get rid of safely nor how to stop them and keep them from restarting at boot time.
Unix+clones Considerations for the system architect: Performance
Post date: April 20, 2005, 06:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 85
Tutorial quote: For many developers and engineers, performance is often an afterthought. But when a product functions as designed and has proven stability and the right feature mix, success in the marketplace often depends upon performance. Architectural decisions define the ultimate feasible performance of any product. In this article, learn how performance-monitoring technology initially developed for mainframes can help you improve your own code's performance.
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 176
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Linux Performance Tools for Optimizing Linux: Process-Specific CPU
Post date: June 1, 2005, 03:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 140
Tutorial quote: The tools to analyze the performance of applications are varied and have existed in one form or another since the early days of UNIX. It is critical to understand how an application is interacting with the operating system, CPU, and memory system to understand its performance. This chapter will help you understand where the bottleneck in your system is occuring, and how to fix it.