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Linux How to set up a mail server on a GNU / Linux system
Post date: February 7, 2006, 02:02 Category: Network Views: 52
Tutorial quote: Easy to follow howto on setting up a mail server with unlimited users and domains, with IMAP/Pop access, anti-spam, anti-virus, secure authentication, encrypted traffic, web mail interface and more.

Based on an Ubuntu distribution platform, but instructions are distro generic.
Debian Speedup DNS requests with a local cache
Post date: April 26, 2006, 05:04 Category: Network Views: 13
Tutorial quote: One common server bottleneck is DNS lookups. Many common server tasks such as from looking up hostnames to write Apache logfiles and processing incoming mail require the use of DNS queries. If you're running a high-traffic system it might be useful to cache previous lookups.
Debian Automated distributed backups for laptops
Post date: February 14, 2006, 16:02 Category: Network Views: 42
Tutorial quote: This document will describe the setup I made for automating the backup tasks for all laptops here in the house. My servers use the same backup server and infrastructure, but right now they don't have the checks and scripts because they are online 24/7 and my backup server is triggering the backup process. This is however not true at all for the laptops.

Laptops can be at different places, powered down, suspended, put to sleep etc. So I needed a different approach for them.
Ubuntu Windows to Ubuntu Transition Guide
Post date: April 8, 2006, 11:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 84
Tutorial quote: Alright, so you have successfully installed Ubuntu Linux, but now what do you do with it? You are in the right place. I am going to get you started with a guide on how to use your new Ubuntu system. This transition guide is targeted at existing Windows users and will show you how to do program installations, a little system configuration, but primarily highlight some Windows "replacement" programs for common applications you can't live without. This guide's intent is to introduce you to equivalent programs to what you are accustomed to and, hopefully, to cover a good amount of what you might want in a new install. I am basing the content on what I have personally experienced, email feedback from my installation article, questions from the PC Mech Forums, and common topics from the Ubuntu Forums. Hopefully this will answer a lot of questions you may have before you ever have them.
Unix+clones How to Set Up a Jabber Server
Post date: April 12, 2005, 12:04 Category: Software Views: 37
Tutorial quote: Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years, you must have heard about instant messaging and how it has changed the world of communications over the Internet. According to http://www.webopedia.com, Instant Messaging (IM) is a service that alerts users when their friends or colleagues are on line and allows them to communicate in real time through private online chat areas. Two of the most popular IM services are AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) and MSN Messenger. Unfortunately, most of the publicly available servers use proprietary protocols that only allow you to communicate with users on the same system. These systems are not compatible with each other and can't be accessed from other clients.

Jabber is an open source implementation of the IM server that aims to change this. It uses streaming XML protocols that are free, open, and public. These protocols have been formalized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) as the approved instant messaging and presence technology under the name of XMPP. The first Jabber technologies were developed in 1998 by Jeremie Miller and is now used on thousands of servers world-wide to enable millions of users to communicate with each other.

The biggest advantage of the Jabber server when compared with commercial IM servers is that, since it is open source, anyone can run a Jabber server and it can be restricted to a specific community like a company work force or a group of friends. In this article, I will document the steps I took to set up a Jabber server and how I managed to overcome the difficulties I faced. Hopefully this will make it easier for you to set up your own Jabber server.
Debian How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster
Post date: March 31, 2006, 14:03 Category: Software Views: 13
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5 cluster with three nodes: two storage nodes and one management node. This cluster is load-balanced by a high-availability load balancer that in fact has two nodes that use the Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).

In this document I use Debian Sarge for all nodes. Therefore the setup might differ a bit for other distributions. The MySQL version I use in this setup is 5.0.19. If you do not want to use MySQL 5, you can use MySQL 4.1 as well, although I haven't tested it.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
Debian Mplayer Configuration
Post date: April 4, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 17
Tutorial quote: MPlayer is a movie and animation player that supports a wide range of codecs and file formats, including MPEG 1/2/4, DivX 3/4/5, Windows Media 7/8/9, RealAudio/Video up to 9, Quicktime 5/6, and Vivo 1/2. It has many MMX/SSE(2)/3Dnow(Ex) optimized native audio and video codecs, but allows using XAnim's and RealPlayer's binary codec plugins, and Win32 codec DLLs. It has basic VCD/DVD playback functionality, including DVD subtitles, but supports many text-based subtitle formats too. For video output, nearly every existing interface is supported. It's also able to convert any supported files to raw/divx/mpeg4 AVI (pcm/mp3 audio), and even video grabbing from V4L devices.
Unix+clones Streaming music with SlimServer
Post date: June 15, 2005, 12:06 Category: Network Views: 72
Tutorial quote: Converting your CD collection into MP3 or another digital file format gives you the ability to enjoy the music on your computer and stream it all over the house and the Internet. To do the latter, however, you have to install and configure a streaming server on your computer. That might sound like a daunting task, but there is a streaming server application that makes the whole process pretty painless. SlimServer from Slim Devices is a cross-platform streaming server that runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X and supports a wide range of formats, including AAC, AIFF, FLAC, Ogg Vorbis, MP3, WAV, and WMA. Although it was developed to stream music files to Slim Devices' Squeezebox2 hardware player, it works perfectly with any software MP3 player capable of working with network streams.
Debian Using the 'snort' Intrusion Detection System
Post date: December 27, 2005, 10:12 Category: Security Views: 71
Tutorial quote: Snort is the leading open source Network Intrusion Detection System and is a valuable addition to the security framework at any site. Even if you are employing lots of preventative measures, such as firewalling, patching, etc., a detection system can give you an assurance that your defences truly are effective, or if not, will give you valuable information about what you need to improve.

Fortunately, there is a good set of snort packages for Debian which takes a lot of the tedious work out of building a useful Network Intrusion Detection System. Before we start on installation, we should review a few details about the networking satack that you're going to need to make sense of the alerts snort will generate. Impatient readers and those who are familiar with the TCP/IP suite of protocols may do now skip to the bit that says Stand alone snort.
Unix+clones SpamAssassin, ClamAV and Procmail Howto
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Network Views: 44
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install SpamAssassin (for filtering SPAM) and ClamAV (for filtering viruses, trojans, worms, etc.) and how to invoke them by using procmail recipes. It is suitable for scenarios where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to local users. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems. I tested it on Debian Woody so far.

In the end you will have a system where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to a local user; the emails are passed to procmail which invokes SpamAssassin and ClamAV in order to filter the emails before they arrive in the user's inbox. However, the installation of Sendmail and Postfix are not covered in this document.

This howto is meant as a practical guide.