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Unix+clones Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 02:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 1462 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
Unix+clones Comparing MySQL performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 02:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 1245 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
Linux Performance Tools for Optimizing Linux: Process-Specific CPU
Post date: June 1, 2005, 02:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 1164 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The tools to analyze the performance of applications are varied and have existed in one form or another since the early days of UNIX. It is critical to understand how an application is interacting with the operating system, CPU, and memory system to understand its performance. This chapter will help you understand where the bottleneck in your system is occuring, and how to fix it.
Linux Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance
Post date: March 31, 2006, 21:03 Category: Optimizing Views: 1831 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU etc. But, most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on the Linux systems.
Linux Benchmarking Maildir Delivery on Linux Filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 02:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 1044 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The goal of this set of benchmarks is to determine which of the leading Linux filesystems (ext2, ext3, ReiserFS, and XFS) offer the best performance when used for accepting maildir deliveries. The resulting system should be a good balance of delivery and retrieval performance under potentially high concurrent filesystem load.
OSX Optimizing Mac OS X performance
Post date: January 18, 2006, 10:01 Category: Optimizing Views: 2716 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This FAQ provides recommendations for optimizing MacĀ® OS X performance. Additionally, it provides advice and links to advice for troubleshooting certain Mac OS X performance problems.
Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part III
Post date: May 31, 2005, 09:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 1797 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: For desktop and laptop users who want a fast-booting operating system, getting rid of services you do not need can appear to improve performance. Obviously, if you are new to Linux, though, you probably do not know which processes you can get rid of safely nor how to stop them and keep them from restarting at boot time.
Ubuntu How to Increase ext3 and ReiserFS filesystems Performance in Linux
Post date: May 13, 2007, 19:05 Category: System Views: 2097 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to increase ext3 and ReiserFS filesystems Performance in Linux.The ext3 or third extended filesystem is a journalled file system that is commonly used by the Linux operating system. It is the default file system for many popular Linux distributions
Debian Aggregating network interfaces
Post date: February 12, 2006, 01:02 Category: Network Views: 1182 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Using more than one hard drive to achieve better performance and fault tolerance is very common. Less well known is that it's also possible to aggregate more than one network interface into a single logical interface. In Linux, this is handled by the bonding driver. Benefits of doing this are much the same as the benefits of aggregating discs using RAID: if one device dies, your server carries on working and by using two devices in parallel, performance can be improved.
OpenSUSE Hacking OpenSUSE
Post date: December 3, 2005, 11:12 Category: System Views: 2950 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: There's more to SUSE Linux than simply installing it and going to work. To get the most from the operating system, you'll probably want to do some post-install fine tuning. This article by Jem Matzan explains how to: add download sources to YaST; install the Mozilla Thunderbird email client; add support for Java, Flash, Acrobat, Windows Media, MP3s, and RealMedia; play DVDs -- and more. It serves as a useful supplement to Steven J. Rosen's excellent how-to, "Installing SUSE Linux 10 on a Laptop," recently published here on DesktopLinux.com. Enjoy . . . !