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Yellow+Dog Installing Linux on the Mac mini
Post date: May 11, 2005, 08:05 Category: Installing Views: 112
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
OSX Panther versus Tiger
Post date: April 29, 2005, 20:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 106
Tutorial quote: According to Apple, "...unmodified applications that use the system math functions will get an automatic performance boost on the G5..." when switching from Panther to Tiger. We decided to run some tests to see if we got a speed gain right out of the box with applications that we suspect use system math functions.
Debian Firebird database Configuration
Post date: May 5, 2006, 13:05 Category: Installing Views: 4
Tutorial quote: Firebird is a relational database offering many ANSI SQL-99 features that runs on Linux, Windows, and a variety of Unix platforms. Firebird offers excellent concurrency, high performance, and powerful language support for stored procedures and triggers. It has been used in production systems, under a variety of names since 1981.

Firebird is a commercially independent project of C and C++ programmers, technical advisors and supporters developing and enhancing a multi-platform relational database management system based on the source code released by Inprise Corp (now known as Borland Software Corp) under the InterBase Public License v.1.0 on 25 July, 2000.
SmoothWall Install SquidGuard on Smoothwall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Software Views: 254
Tutorial quote: squidGuard describes itself as: "An ultrafast and free filter, redirector and access controller for Squid". In my experience, it is the ideal web filter for use with Smoothwall and IpCop since it is lightweight and easy to set up. I use it on an i486, 33Mhz system with 18Mb of Ram and 500Mb of hard drive - and while there is a minor performance hit, the hit is not significant.

This simple how-to describes the steps I took to install squidGuard on my system - it should work for yours too.
Debian VHCS ISP Control Panel Configuration
Post date: April 6, 2006, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 24
Tutorial quote: VHCS delivers a complete hosting automation appliance by offering significant security, total-cost-of-ownership, and performance advantages over competing commercial solutions.

With VHCS Pro you can configure your server and applications, create user with domains with a few point-and-click operations that take less than a minute. There is no limit to the number of resellers, users and domains that can be created.At the core of VHCS Pro are 3 easy-to-use, Web-based control panels. VHCS provides graphic user interfaces for the administrators, resellers and users
Unix+clones Apache Maintenance Basics
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: Software Views: 40
Tutorial quote: You've downloaded and configured your Apache server and are ready to move on to the next project. Can it really be left to fend for itself in a darkened room?

Yes. To some degree, anyway. With the exception of configuration testing, once Apache is up, you likely need never think about how the Web server is running.

On the other hand, completely ignoring your Apache installation would be foolhardy. Doing some regular checks and maintenance on your Apache installation helps identify any issues — usually before they even become issues — and helps you stay up date with the latest security and performance patches. This article covers some of the major steps and maintenance tasks that should be regularly undertaken while the Apache system is running.
Unix+clones Installing and securing Squid
Post date: March 13, 2006, 10:03 Category: Software Views: 67
Tutorial quote: Squid is a high-performance proxy caching server for web clients, supporting FTP, gopher, and HTTP data objects. Unlike traditional caching software, Squid handles all requests in a single, non-blocking, I/O-driven process. Squid keeps meta data and especially hot objects cached in RAM, caches DNS lookups, supports non-blocking DNS lookups, and implements negative caching of failed requests. Squid supports SSL, extensive access controls, and full request logging. By using the lightweight Internet Cache Protocol, Squid caches can be arranged in a hierarchy or mesh for additional bandwidth savings.

After the installation and base configuration of squid we will add another layer of security by chrooting it.
Unix+clones Get More Out of Your Pipe with Apache and mod_gzip
Post date: April 14, 2005, 09:04 Category: Network Views: 41
Tutorial quote: Some Web sites seem like they are designed to annoy and alienate visitors. Teeny tiny fixed fonts, weirdo fixed page widths, ad servers on Mars, and the content won't load until the ads do, and all kinds of dynamic jiggery-pokery that does everything but quickly deliver a nice, readable page.

Webmasters who are serious about running high-performance Web servers, and who want pleased and delighted visitors, have a great tool in Apache 1.3's mod_gzip. mod_gzip compresses pages on the fly, reducing their size considerably. Depending on the types of files served, you'll see size reductions ranging from 20%- 80%, and a nice increase in server efficiency. Nothing is needed on the client side, except sane modern Web browsers like Mozilla, Firefox, Opera, Galeon, and Konqueror. Mozilla, Firefox, and Opera are nice cross-platform browsers with all kinds of neat features, so don't be afraid to standardize on one of them.
Linux Linux stateful firewall design
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
RedHat My First Linux Server, Part 1
Post date: April 14, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 100
Tutorial quote: Many small businesses are turning to Linux as way to swim against the tide of rising software costs. Are you thinking about diving into Linux for your small business? From the outside, Linux can appear to be a deep ocean of strange jargon in unchartered waters. Who has the time to wade through all that to save a few clams? With Linux, it's not a sink or swim proposition.

Linux is now a lot simpler than you may think. We can provide you with the easiest, simplest, no-problem process for installing Linux on a PC. After going through this simple installation process, you will have a basic machine that you can configure into any kind of server, workstation, or office desktop. Future articles in this My First Linux Server series will help you build productive, Linux-based servers and small office workstations.

The best choices for your first Linux machine are probably the popular Red Hat Linux or SUSE Linux, primarily because both are easy to install and configure. Additionally, these companies are sound choices for the home office or small business. Both vendors have specialized in Linux for many years and offer full corporate product lines supporting your expansion.