Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Quickly installing OpenBSD 3.3

Solaris Installing Solaris using JumpStart technology on an Intel laptop
Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Installing Views: 97
Tutorial quote: An interesting use of Solaris 8 on a PC laptop is for use with the JumpStart technology. It has never been so easy to install, re-install, or restore a server before.

As I am as a contractor, I am more on the road than in my own office, so I need a laptop, and preferably with Solaris installed, as I am focusing on Sun's products and applications.

Through the years, I have discovered that one of the most common scenarios is that a client needs a server installed, either because they just bought it, or need it re-installed, or recovered.

This article covers how to save time when installing servers, using the JumpStart technology on a laptop with Solaris for Intel.
Debian Installing Debian
Post date: September 30, 2005, 12:09 Category: Installing Views: 138
Tutorial quote: The experience of installing Debian can vary widely depending on your hardware and requirements. There simply isn't room here to provide a comprehensive installation guide. Instead, you'll find an outline of the major points of the installation process, and plenty of information about where to go and what to do when things don't work as expected.

While Debian has a great reputation for day-to-day use, it has a poor (and not entirely unmerited) reputation for ease of installation. However, with the Debian 3.1 release, code-named Sarge, the developers have taken major steps to improve the installation experience, so don't be afraid.

Perhaps the best advice I can give concerning Debian installation is to not expect to always get it right the first time. If you're ready to start over and experiment, you'll soon become happy with the installation process.
Unix+clones Using the GNU Privacy Guard
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Software Views: 38
Tutorial quote: Tonight we will investigate the gnupg utility (version 1.07). I will be running it on an OpenBSD 3.2 system but, as usual, any unix-like system should not display any significant differences. I will assume that GPG is already installed.

The GNU Privacy Guard can be regarded as a complete replacement for the popular PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) software. The difference between the two is that GnuPG does not have any licensing restrictions and it also runs on more platforms. They are both open source products. Although owned by a commercial entity, a freeware version of PGP is available (although only for Windows and Macintosh).

In a nutshell, what all this software does is allow two parties to communicate securely. This implies the following:
- the message has arrived at its destination unaltered
- the message can only be read by its intended recipient
- the authenticity of the sender has been verified by the recipient
Debian Creating a Wiki with kwiki
Post date: December 17, 2005, 17:12 Category: Software Views: 52
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Unix+clones Get More Out of Your Pipe with Apache and mod_gzip
Post date: April 14, 2005, 09:04 Category: Network Views: 41
Tutorial quote: Some Web sites seem like they are designed to annoy and alienate visitors. Teeny tiny fixed fonts, weirdo fixed page widths, ad servers on Mars, and the content won't load until the ads do, and all kinds of dynamic jiggery-pokery that does everything but quickly deliver a nice, readable page.

Webmasters who are serious about running high-performance Web servers, and who want pleased and delighted visitors, have a great tool in Apache 1.3's mod_gzip. mod_gzip compresses pages on the fly, reducing their size considerably. Depending on the types of files served, you'll see size reductions ranging from 20%- 80%, and a nice increase in server efficiency. Nothing is needed on the client side, except sane modern Web browsers like Mozilla, Firefox, Opera, Galeon, and Konqueror. Mozilla, Firefox, and Opera are nice cross-platform browsers with all kinds of neat features, so don't be afraid to standardize on one of them.
Arch Installing Vmware
Post date: April 14, 2005, 05:04 Category: Software Views: 98
Tutorial quote: VMware installs on ArchLinux pretty well, but its not totally straight forward.
FreeBSD Installing ProFTPD
Post date: August 26, 2005, 09:08 Category: Network Views: 144
Tutorial quote: This document is about replacing the standard ftpd from the FreeBSD kernel with the fancier ProFTPd.
Arch X11 Cursors
Post date: April 13, 2005, 21:04 Category: Desktop Views: 142
Tutorial quote: There are many cursor themes available for the X11 Windowing System besides the default black pointer.
This guide will instruct you on where to get them, installing them, and configuring them.
Gentoo Proftpd with mysql authentication, software qouta, traffic shaper and SSL
Post date: May 26, 2005, 13:05 Category: Network Views: 105
Tutorial quote: A short, but detailed howto about installing ProFTPD with all the bells and whistles on Gentoo.
FreeBSD Installing FreeBSD on IBM Netvista S40
Post date: May 8, 2005, 17:05 Category: Installing Views: 162
Tutorial quote: In this note we shall talk about installing FreeBSD on a very interesting and elegant machine: IBM Netvista S40. In its creator own terminology, it is "legacy-free". The computer has no parallel, serial, AT keyboard, nor PS/2 mouse ports. No floppy controller either. Instead, it has 5 USB ports (2 frontal and 3 rear) connected to a single USB controller. Besides these USB ports, the system only counts with standard video and audio connectors. The video controller is Intel 82810E SVGA and audio chip is Intel ICH 82801AA, both integrated onboard. The CPU is Intel PIII at 866MHz. The machine is further equipped with a fast Intel Pro PCI network adapter containing a PXE/RIPL boot prom. A quiet 20G Quantum Fireball HDD and a Liteon ATAPI CD-ROM, both connected as masters, constitute the storage subsystem. The case is Flex ATX, a small form factor.