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Linux Recursively Encrypt / Decrypt Directories using gpgdir on Linux
Post date: January 24, 2010, 06:01 Category: Security Views: 942 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: gpgdir is a script that encrypts and decrypts directories using a GPG key. It supports recursively descending through a directory in order to make sure it encrypts or decrypts every file in a directory and all of its subdirectories.
OpenSUSE Encrypt-Decrypt files using mcrypt on OpenSuse
Post date: January 27, 2009, 07:01 Category: Security Views: 1240 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: MCrypt is a replacement for the old crypt() package and crypt(1) command, with extensions. It allows developers to use a wide range of encryption functions, without making drastic changes to their code. It allows users to encrypt files or data streams without having to be cryptographers. Above all, it allows you to have some really neat code on your machine. :)

The companion to MCrypt is Libmcrypt, which contains the actual encryption functions themselves, and provides a standardized mechanism for accessing them.
Debian System encryption on Debian Etch
Post date: August 16, 2006, 16:08 Category: Security Views: 2852 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this article I will describe how to setup a nearly complete encrypted system using Debian Etch and cryptsetup with LUKS. The goal is: encrypt all partitions except /boot. The user should enter a password at boot time or provide a keyfile on an USB device to decrypt the root partition. Keyfiles for additional partitions are located on the root, so the user does not need to enter a password for every partition.
Linux TrueCrypt Tutorial: Truly Portable Data Encryption
Post date: July 2, 2007, 23:07 Category: Security Views: 1510 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: TrueCrypt is a free software that encrypts data on-the-fly. Right now the newest version released is version 4.3. You can create an encrypted hard drive, a separate partition or a directory with TrueCrypt. It does not simply encrypt the content of files, but their names and the names of the directories they are in as well. Moreover there is no way to check the size of the encrypted directory/HDD/partition. TrueCrypt is available for Windows and Linux.
Fedora How To Back Up Your Files With Areca On Fedora 9
Post date: June 1, 2008, 08:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1973 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Areca is a personal file backup software developed in Java. It allows you to select files or directories to back up, filter, encrypt and compress their content, and store them on your backup location. Areca supports incremental backups and generates backup reports, which can be stored on your disk or sent by email. This guide explains how to install and use it on a Fedora 9 desktop (GNOME).
Debian Creating A Fully Encrypted Para-Virtualised Xen Guest System Using Debian Lenny
Post date: May 3, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1058 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This document explains how to set up a fully encrypted para-virtualized XEN instance. In this howto, the host system is running Debian Etch, while the guest system to be installed will be using Debian Lenny. If you are concerned about your privacy, you might want to consider using hard disk encryption to protect your valuable private data from spying eyes. Usually, the easiest way would be to use your distribution's installer to set up a fully encrypted system; I think most recent Linux distributions support this. However, when you are using XEN to provide virtualization, there are situations where you might not want to encrypt your whole computer with all guest instances, but instead only encrypt one OS instance. This howto will deal with exactly this situation. It assumes that the XEN host system is already up and running.
Linux Creating a safe directory with PAM and Encfs
Post date: June 7, 2006, 20:06 Category: Security Views: 1338 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Now, in my network (and others) the credentials provided at login could (and should) be used by those programs. How can you retrieve these credentials, providing enough security?
With a the PAM modules pam_script it's possible to store the password in a file, which will be used by fusemb and mount.cifs to read the password from.

To achieve security, one could make the user logging in owner and deny read/write for anybody else. Remove this file when the user ends his/her session.
This is enough, for runtime. But I was wondering, but what if the system crashes, and the file with the credentials remains on the harddrive? Anybody who is able to mount this harddrive with for example a lifecd, can read this file!

That's why I was looking for a way to encrypt this file.

With encfs this is very possible! At run time it gives an interface to encrypted files and directories, which does only exist at runtime! When the system is not running, there are only encrypted files, useless when you do not know the key to it. And this key is exactly the (encrypted) password! That's why I've chosen for a combination of PAM and Encfs.
Linux Encrypt CD/DVDs
Post date: October 28, 2008, 05:10 Category: Security Views: 981 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This guide can be adapted to any distro, its not Ubuntu specific.
OpenSUSE Krsync - A Kommander based GUI frontend for rsync
Post date: January 11, 2009, 20:01 Category: Network Views: 1205 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Krsync is a simple GUI frontend for the famous rsync to synchronize files and directories between systems or even two different directories on the same server. Krsync is a Kommander based GUI for rsync.
Ubuntu Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 7.10
Post date: March 11, 2008, 10:03 Category: Desktop Views: 1183 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
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