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Debian Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)
Post date: January 21, 2006, 00:01 Category: Software Views: 808 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Linux Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2
Post date: April 15, 2005, 12:04 Category: Network Views: 1112 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
Debian Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux system
Post date: November 25, 2006, 02:11 Category: System Views: 1272 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: You arrive at a Debian GNU/Linux server which has some history of neglection. Let's suppose someone else neglected it but if your new-year resolution is to stop neglecting your beloved server, this applies as well.

One form of neglection is to install, install, install and never un-install any package. The common utility to perform installation and un-installation of packages is apt-get which adds to the problem because it doesn't have automatic removal of non-needed dependences.

That means that when phpMyAdmin was installed it also installed Apache, PHP and ton of other packages. phpMyAdmin was removed when it was no longer needed but Apache, PHP and the ton of packages remain there.

Aptitude to the rescue.
Debian Creating .deb-Packages With Checkinstall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 12:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 822 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Checkinstall is a nice tool to create simple .deb-packages that you can use in your local network (e.g. if you have to install the same piece of software on multiple computers running Debian). It lets you compile and install software from the sources like before, but with the difference that you end up with a simple Debian package which also means that you can easily uninstall the software you just compiled by running dpkg -r!

I will demonstrate the use of checkinstall by compiling and installing the anti-virus software ClamAV on a Debian system.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
OpenSUSE rpmorphan - Find & delete orphaned packages in openSUSE
Post date: February 8, 2009, 13:02 Category: System Views: 739 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: rpmorphan is a free opensource utility to find orphaned packages on your openSUSE installation. rpmorphan determines which packages on the system has no other package(s) depending on their installation, and lists these packages.
Debian Rescuing systems using the Debian snapshot server
Post date: September 18, 2006, 09:09 Category: System Views: 3177 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: One of the unofficial Debian project resources which doesn't get the attention it deserves is the Debian Snapshot site. The site contains a mirror of old Debian packages, which can be very useful for system recovery.

In most normal cases you won't ever need to use it, unless you're wanting to compare two different package versions to see changes, or do other non-standard things. However when you do need to use it you'll learn what a big lifesaver it is!

The biggest use for the site, for me, has been for recovering from broken package updates. Whilst these are rare in the Debian Stable and Testing releases they can be an issue when running Debian unstable.
Debian Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel
Post date: December 29, 2005, 01:12 Category: System Views: 1541 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
Ubuntu Apt-Cacher-NG - HTTP download proxy for software packages
Post date: February 24, 2009, 01:02 Category: System Views: 757 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Apt-Cacher-ng is a software package that keeps a cache, on the disk, of Debian/Ubuntu Packages and Release files.When an apt-get like client issues a request for a file, Apt-Cacher intercepts it and if the file is already cached it serves it to the client immediately, otherwise it fetches the file from the Internet, saves it on the cache, and then serves it to the client. This means that several Debian machines can be upgraded but each package need to be downloaded only once.
Debian How To Search For Missing Packages With apt-file On Debian and Ubuntu
Post date: February 21, 2007, 13:02 Category: System Views: 1032 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This short article describes how you can search for missing packages with apt-file on Debian and Ubuntu systems. apt-file allows you to search for a file name, and it gives back the name(s) of the package(s) containing that file so that you can install the appropriate package.
FreeBSD Working with gmirror on a Sun Fire X2100 (part 2)
Post date: August 29, 2006, 10:08 Category: System Views: 1170 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Editorial note: This is the followup to Greg's previous piece, and continues where part one left off. It is recommended that you read and understand the content presented in part one before attempting any of the procedures documented here. Now without further ado...