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Search results for Software RAID and Encrypted Filesystem Benchmarks

Gentoo EVMS Howto for Gentoo Linux
Post date: April 15, 2005, 00:04 Category: Hardware Views: 453
Tutorial quote: EVMS stands for Enterprise Volume Management System. It's a all-in-one utility written by IBM to manage disk partitions, logical volumes, software RAID and even filesystems.

It does everything from installing the partition table to mounting volumes, fscking and resizing them. It has a plugin mechanism which allow a user to extend EVMS with external drivers.
Debian Create an Encrypted Loopback Device
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Security Views: 89
Tutorial quote: A loopback device is a very special device that allows you to mount a normal file as it was a physical device. loopbacks can be encrypted: this becomes very useful sometimes.

Consider, as na example, that you need to encrypt a few files, nothing big, let's say 100 MB or so. Encrypting an entire partition could be too much. Then a cryptoloop could be the right solution to your problem.
Debian dmcrypt
Post date: January 25, 2006, 17:01 Category: Security Views: 85
Tutorial quote: Device-mapper is a new infrastructure in the Linux 2.6 kernel that provides a generic way to create virtual layers of block devices that can do different things on top of real block devices like striping, concatenation, mirroring, snapshotting, etc... The device-mapper is used by the LVM2 and EVMS 2.x tools. dm-crypt is such a device-mapper target that provides transparent encryption of block devices using the new Linux 2.6 cryptoapi. Writes to this device will be encrypted and reads decrypted. You can mount your filesystem on it as usual. But without the key you can't access your data. It does basically the same as cryptoloop only that it's a much cleaner code and better suits the need of a block device and has a more flexible configuration interface. The on-disk format is also compatible.
Linux Howto install the base Linux system onto a USB thumbdrive with the root partition encrypted
Post date: April 20, 2006, 08:04 Category: System Views: 23
Tutorial quote: This howto will explain how to install a very basesystem onto a USB thumbdrive with the root partition encrypted. It includes support for cryptsetup-luks, and udev.
BSD Managing Filesystems : fstab
Post date: April 15, 2005, 19:04 Category: System Views: 87
Tutorial quote: Understanding how the BSD filesystem manages disk space is critical to successfully managing a BSD server or workstation. However, this topic is generally overlooked since it is rarely used outside of installation and upgrades. It is also a very simple topic and most people assume you understand how it all works.

This article gives a quick synopsis on filesystem layout and tries to briefly explain how to understand /etc/fstab. The fstab(5) man pages, while good, do little to teach the basics to new sysadmins.
Unix+clones Encrypted NFS with OpenSSH
Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Network Views: 44
Tutorial quote: NFS is a widely deployed, mature, and understood protocol that allows computers to share files over a network. The main problems with NFS are that it relies on the inherently insecure UDP protocol, transactions are not encrypted, hosts and users cannot be easily authenticated, and its difficulty in firewalling. This article provides a solution to most of these problems for Linux clients and servers. These principles may also be applied to any UNIX server with ssh installed. This article assumes basic knowledge of NFS and firewalling for Linux.
Linux The Linux /proc Filesystem as a Programmers' Tool
Post date: June 22, 2005, 05:06 Category: Programming Views: 137
Tutorial quote: My entry into systems programming was guided by my desire to understand further the operating systems I was working with daily as a contract UNIX and, later, Linux system administrator. The result of this was ifchk, a packet sniffer detector I wrote in C and released in June of 2003. ifchk initially was written under IRIX and then ported to Linux, mostly under the 2.4 kernel. The current ifchk revision, beta 4, recently was released and beta 5 is on the way.

My work on ifchk has allowed me to examine programmatically several areas of operating system functionality. Examples include the Linux netlink(7) and rtnetlink(7) facilities, device control--that is, network interfaces--via ioctl(2), signals and proc, the process filesystem. Proc and its ability to display a wide array of data concerning the runtime state of a system are the focus of our discussion here.
Unix+clones Benchmarking BSD and Linux
Post date: June 18, 2005, 18:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 99
Tutorial quote: These benchmarks are the result of my scalable network programming research. My interest in this area is to see how scalable and fast network applications can be on standard PC hardware.

I have done most of my research on Linux 2.4, 2.5 and 2.6 kernels using a home-grown distribution I affectionately call "Leanux". I have experimented with several APIs and methods to try and get the most scalability and performance out of a web server. The ultimate goal, however, is to demonstrate scalability by surviving a Slashdotting.
SuSe A Fresh Approach - SUSE 10.1 package management
Post date: May 12, 2006, 09:05 Category: System Views: 4
Tutorial quote: In SUSE 9.x and 10.0 the default package management software was the software management module and yast online update ( YOU ) in YaST2 and the susewatcher system tray applet. The susewatcher applet would faithfully report any security or system updates and would let you launch YOU to download and apply the updates. For third party software you could add online repositories to the installation sources module and ultimately you could manage all your software from the software management module, again in YaST2.
Debian Aggregating network interfaces
Post date: February 12, 2006, 02:02 Category: Network Views: 43
Tutorial quote: Using more than one hard drive to achieve better performance and fault tolerance is very common. Less well known is that it's also possible to aggregate more than one network interface into a single logical interface. In Linux, this is handled by the bonding driver. Benefits of doing this are much the same as the benefits of aggregating discs using RAID: if one device dies, your server carries on working and by using two devices in parallel, performance can be improved.