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Unix+clones How to securely send and retrieve your mail via SSH
Post date: April 17, 2005, 20:04 Category: Network Views: 39
Tutorial quote: SSH allows you to create an encrypted network tunnel between your machine and other network. This document will show you how to set up this tunnel and then use it to securely send and retrieve your mail.
Debian Loop-AES
Post date: January 25, 2006, 18:01 Category: Security Views: 71
Tutorial quote: This is a step by step tutorial on creating an encrypted partition using Loop-AES (using AES-256). This tutorial is known to work under sarge.

Loop-AES is more secure than dm-crypt (and possibly faster), although it requires a custom kernel module and is more work to install than dm-crypt.
IPCop Setup your own VPN with IPCop and OpenVPN
Post date: March 30, 2006, 12:03 Category: Network Views: 37
Tutorial quote: I ’m a huge fan of IPCop. It’s a great firewall distro that makes administration a snap using a slick web interface. My goal was to use IPCop and an easy-to-use VPN client to allow access to my LAN while away from home.

I ended up going with the ZERINA OpenVPN addon for IPCop and the OpenVPN GUI for Windows.

If you’ve ever wanted full, secure, encrypted access to your LAN from any remote location, here is your guide.

Just follow these ten easy steps…
Mepis Upgrading to Linux from Windows 98
Post date: April 18, 2005, 03:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 134
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial-style article, Michael C. Barnes outlines a strategy to avoid costly upgrades from Windows 98 to Windows XP -- in terms of both hardware and software -- by upgrading to Linux, instead. Barnes reviews the typical requirements of computers used for relatively generic purposes, and shows how to give a new lease on life to aging laptops and PCs by replacing obsolete OSes such as Windows 98 with a combination of Linux, free open source applications, and inexpensive commercial software.
Fedora+Core Enhancing Apache with mod_security
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Security Views: 93
Tutorial quote: Like probably quite a few of you, I run and admin some websites (some for fun, some for work), and as many of you surely do, some of these websites are mounted on a CMS. CMS are not the 8th wonder of the world, however some of them are pretty good, and they save you a lot of time by automating tons of tasks... however, as in every piece of code there exists, all of them are insecure and buggy (in fact, every piece of software is insecure and buggy to a degree)

So, searching for tools and ways to prevent people from breaking into my site without authorization, I began my search and found a great piece of software: mod_security for Apache.
Unix+clones The 'no-configuration, only-active-when-needed' SSH VPN
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: So, we started thinking about how we might set up a VPN between the application server and our internal software mirror. The only requirement is that the VPN be initiated from the "inside-out" and that the connection is only active for as long as we need to use. In other words, it would only be active during an administration session. Ideally, it wouldn't be a lot of work to setup and tear down either.

SSH to the rescue...

Fortunately, SSH client and server come with support for this out of the box, requiring no additional software to be installed, and no configuration changes. On the server side, sshd, the setting "AllowTcpForwarding" defaults to "yes" unless your sshd_config file explicitly disables it. On the client side, all you have to do is request the forwarding.
Debian Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: Software Views: 33
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
BSD Firewalling with OpenBSD's PF packet filter
Post date: April 18, 2005, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 101
Tutorial quote: PF operates in a world which consists of packets, protocols, connections and ports.

Based on where a packet is coming from or where it's going, which protocol, connection of port it is designated for, PF is able to determine where to lead the packet, or decide if it is to be let through at all.

It's equally possible to direct network traffic based on packet contents, usually referred to as application level filtering, but this is not the kind of thing PF does. We will come back later to some cases where PF will hand off these kinds of tasks to other software, but first let us deal with some basics.

We've already mentioned the firewall concept. One important feature of PF and similar software, perhaps the most important feature, is that it is able to identify and block traffic which is you do not want to let into your local network or let out to the world outside. At some point the term 'firewall' was coined.
Unix+clones Using the GNU Privacy Guard
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Software Views: 38
Tutorial quote: Tonight we will investigate the gnupg utility (version 1.07). I will be running it on an OpenBSD 3.2 system but, as usual, any unix-like system should not display any significant differences. I will assume that GPG is already installed.

The GNU Privacy Guard can be regarded as a complete replacement for the popular PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) software. The difference between the two is that GnuPG does not have any licensing restrictions and it also runs on more platforms. They are both open source products. Although owned by a commercial entity, a freeware version of PGP is available (although only for Windows and Macintosh).

In a nutshell, what all this software does is allow two parties to communicate securely. This implies the following:
- the message has arrived at its destination unaltered
- the message can only be read by its intended recipient
- the authenticity of the sender has been verified by the recipient
Debian Virtual Users And Domains With Postfix, Courier And MySQL (+ SMTP-AUTH, Quota, SpamAssassin, ClamAV)
Post date: October 9, 2005, 14:10 Category: Network Views: 213
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a mail server based on Postfix that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I'll also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses.

The resulting Postfix server is capable of SMTP-AUTH and TLS and quota (quota is not built into Postfix by default, I'll show how to patch your Postfix appropriately). Passwords are stored in encrypted form in the database (most documents I found were dealing with plain text passwords which is a security risk). In addition to that, this tutorial covers the installation of Amavisd, SpamAssassin and ClamAV so that emails will be scanned for spam and viruses.