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Linux Linux Web Filtering in 7 steps
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Network Views: 423
Tutorial quote: How to install a transparent Squid proxy server with real-time HTTP virus scanning on Mandrake 10.0 using DansGuardian and ClamAV?

People quickly and easily access volumes of research on the Internet and correspond with a mouse click. For more and more companies, content filtering is part of the large battle to combat all kinds of online threats, including hackers, worms and viruses. Linux content filtering allows administrators to configure and manage Internet access across the entire network and to block unwanted Web content like pornography, shopping Web sites, games and gambling.

This guide contains all the necessary information for installing and understanding the architectural layout of the implementation. It was written with the assumption that you understand how to install programs and have a basic understanding of Linux Mandrake. This includes installing Linux Mandrake and RPM packages, editing files, making directories, compiling software and understanding general UNIX commands. This guide doesn’t explain how to use or configure Squid, DansGuardian and ClamAV but information on where to obtain this information can be found in the “Additional information” section.
FreeBSD Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd
Post date: November 30, 2005, 19:11 Category: Software Views: 79
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.