Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Taking advantage of SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

RedHat Taking advantage of SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: Security Views: 1811 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 debuts the first commercially supported inclusion of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). An installation of Red Hat's latest enterprise operating system has SELinux installed and enabled by default. In the past SELinux has been criticized for a lack of commercial support, many big sites were unable to use it due to the lack of support (Fedora Core 3 doesn't have the support that they require). Now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, SELinux is a supported part of the OS, and such objections to the use of SELinux have gone away. SELinux is now widely regarded as being suitable for the largest sites.
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3568 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
OpenSUSE Tomboy - Desktop Note Taking in openSUSE Linux
Post date: August 31, 2008, 18:08 Category: Desktop Views: 1094 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Tomboy is a desktop note-taking application for Linux and Unix. Simple and easy to use, but with potential to help you organize the ideas and information you deal with every day. Tomboy is written in C# and utilizes the Mono runtime and Gtk#. Automatic spell-checking is provided by GtkSpell.
RedHat Tuning and Optimizing Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Oracle 9i and 10g Databases
Post date: December 19, 2007, 06:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 3640 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This article is a step by step guide for tuning and optimizing Red Hat Enterprise Linux on x86 and x86-64 platforms running Oracle 9i (32bit/64bit) and Oracle 10g (32bit/64bit) standalone and RAC databases. This guide covers Red Hat Enterprise Linux Advanced Server 3 and 4 and the older version 2.1.
White+Box The perfect Setup - White Box Linux
Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Installing Views: 2720 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to be taken to setup a Linux server based on White Box Linux that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.).

Since White Box Linux is very similar to Red Hat Enterprise Linux this tutorial should also work for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
RedHat NIST Publically-Released Red Hat Enterprise Linux Benchmark
Post date: October 21, 2006, 04:10 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2667 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The Benchmark is a compilation of security configuration actions and settings that "harden" Red Hat Linux operating systems. It is a CIS Level-I benchmark: the prudent level of minimum due care for operating system security. This benchmark was developed and tested on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) including RHEL 2.1, RHEL 3.0, and Fedora Core 1, 2, & 3. It is likely to work for other Linux distributions - especially Red Hat and Fedora derivatives - as well.
SuSe Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9
Post date: June 22, 2005, 09:06 Category: System Views: 1597 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) requires an understanding of the login process, including local account files, system accounts, and managing identities.

Using a console shell or the graphical environment are two possible methods of working on a SLES machine.

Finding your way around a SLES installation requires an in-depth knowledge of the filesystem layout. Essential filesystem components are documented and explained in this chapter. Basic filesystem permissions are also described.
OpenSUSE Virtual Box - How to Install & Configure in openSUSE
Post date: August 9, 2008, 17:08 Category: Emulation Views: 1753 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: VirtualBox is a family of powerful x86 virtualization products for enterprise as well as home use. Not only is VirtualBox an extremely feature rich, high performance product for enterprise customers, it is also the only professional solution that is freely available as Open Source Software under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL).
Linux Mastering the Enterprise Volume Management System
Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: System Views: 1198 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The Enterprise Volume Management System, or EVMS, is a disk, partition, and file system manager for Linux that claims to be a comprehensive tool for all disk management tasks. I ran across EVMS and found the idea appealing, so I decided to try it out. I've been working with it for a couple of weeks now, and this article describes what I found.
Unix+clones Running A MySQL-Based DNS Server: MyDNS
Post date: January 23, 2006, 15:01 Category: Network Views: 1291 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure MyDNS, a DNS server that uses a MySQL database as backend instead of configuration files like, for example, Bind or djbdns. This has the advantage that you can easily use web-based frontends to administrate your DNS records. You could even write your own frontend, e.g. using PHP, to interact with the MyDNS database. MyDNS simply reads the records from the database, and it does not have to be restarted/reloaded when DNS records change or zones are created/edited/deleted! This is a major advantage.
Website Python Coding Tutorial Solution For Every Bookie Gambling Player.