Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for The Perfect Setup - CentOS 4.3 (64-bit)

Linux Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2
Post date: April 15, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 51
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
Unix+clones Emulating an OS with qemu
Post date: May 22, 2005, 04:05 Category: Emulation Views: 86
Tutorial quote: When you want to emulate a PC with a complete operating system on your computer, the most heard answer would be VMWare. Sure, for Linux, there is wine, but that package is targeted to handle only window$ and not all programs are supported. No, I'm talking about simulating a complete OS on a virtual PC with virtual hardware.

Although VMware does an almost perfect job at it, it isn't free software. Time to see what the Open Source community has to offer. That's when I stumbled upon qemu. Let's have a look at the possibilities.
Unix+clones Tune and Tweak NFS for Top Performance
Post date: June 25, 2005, 20:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 118
Tutorial quote: As promised in our previous NFS article, we will now explore mount options in a bit more detail. We will also talk about differences between NFS implementations among various UNIX flavors, and the wonderful capability automatic mounting provides.
OpenSUSE ISP Server Setup - OpenSUSE 10 RC 1
Post date: October 9, 2005, 14:10 Category: Network Views: 248
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to be taken to setup a OpenSUSE 10.0 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.) and the ISPConfig control panel.
Ubuntu ISP-Server Setup - Ubuntu 5.0.4 "The Hoary Hedgehog"
Post date: October 9, 2005, 14:10 Category: Network Views: 163
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to be taken to setup a Ubuntu based server (Ubuntu 5.0.4 - The Hoary Hedgehog) that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/POP3s/IMAP/IMAPs, Quota, Firewall, etc.).
OSX VNC control of a Mac under OS X 10.4
Post date: December 10, 2005, 03:12 Category: Network Views: 60
Tutorial quote: VNC support is built right into Tiger. This means you can remote control you mac from an another mac a PC or even you Palm or Blackberry.

However the functionality is a bit hidden. Here are the simple steps to set it up. Remember this is TIGER not Panther.
Linux Tuning up your IDE hard disks using hdparm
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 80
Tutorial quote: hdparm is a tool for altering various parameters associated with IDE drives (Not SCSI). This involves things like the block prefetch, the DMA/PIO modes,
and a number of other things.

I'm writing this mini-how-to to help people get more from their system. People often complain that Linux is a bit slow for them (which it can be) I haven't seen such a post recently, but I know on TechIMO at least we always used to be talking people through using hdparm.
Linux Automating the Login Script
Post date: April 17, 2005, 06:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 52
Tutorial quote: In a perfect world, you could spend a few weeks creating a system and the result would be a system that never required manual maintenance or modifications. Whether this ideal will ever be achieved is debatable, but it definitely won't happen in the near future. In the meantime, we still have to do things manually, even if only once in a while. When I must do things manually, I'm not usually happy about it. In fact, it usually means that there has been an emergency, so other people aren't happy about it either. In times like this, it is nice to have a consistent and efficient user interface on every machine. The information and examples presented in this article assume that you are using the bash shell. However, you can modify all of the scripts so that they work in other shells. In some cases, they might even work unmodified (like in the standard Bourne Shell [sh]). Other shells will also work, but they might have different methods for changing the prompt and creating command aliases. The principles in this article should be relatively easy to adapt to the shell of your choice.
Debian Mini-Howto for User Mode Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: System Views: 73
Tutorial quote: UML ("User Mode Linux") allows you to run multiple Linux servers on one physical machine. This can be handy for many different purposes. For example, you might want to give different people root rights, but prevent them from interfering with one another. Or, you might want to have several identically configured servers, one for production, one for development, and one for testing, but without investing in multiple physical machines.

Once you have prepared your machine for running UML instances as described in the following section, adding new instances will take less than five minutes. The preparation, however, might take a bit longer.
Solaris Restoring a Sun system using JumpStart technology
Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Installing Views: 96
Tutorial quote: If a server crash and the file systems are corrupted or totally destroyed, then the only way to recover the data is to restore from backups. If it is only user data that is corrupted, the task is in general simple, but if the system disk fails, then there is a little bit more work involved in order to to recover the system. This article explains how to backup Sun systems using ufsrestore over NFS, and how to use Sun's JumpStart technology to restore Sun servers and workstations over the network.