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Unix+clones SpamAssassin, ClamAV and Procmail Howto
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Network Views: 44
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install SpamAssassin (for filtering SPAM) and ClamAV (for filtering viruses, trojans, worms, etc.) and how to invoke them by using procmail recipes. It is suitable for scenarios where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to local users. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems. I tested it on Debian Woody so far.

In the end you will have a system where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to a local user; the emails are passed to procmail which invokes SpamAssassin and ClamAV in order to filter the emails before they arrive in the user's inbox. However, the installation of Sendmail and Postfix are not covered in this document.

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
Debian Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin
Post date: April 4, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 36
Tutorial quote: "Munin" means "memory".

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine "what's different today" when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you're doing capacity wise on all limited resources.

It uses the excellent RRDTool and is written in Perl. Munin has a master/node architecture in which the master connects to all the nodes at regular intervals and asks them for sdata. It then stores the data in RRD files, and (if needed) updates the graphs. One of the main goals has been ease of creating new plugins (graphs).
SuSe Correct Multimedia Support in SUSE Linux 9.2
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 109
Tutorial quote: SUSE Linux is one of the better desktop Linux distributions on the market today, providing a functional and aesthetically pleasing environment for the new Linux user as well as seasoned veterans. On thing that puzzles many users is the lack of proper multimedia support in SUSE. The developers have basically crippled it from playing virtually all types of multimedia content that's common on the Internet today. This can be a frustrating dilema for new users, so I have written a short HOWTO to help you get everything in order on your new desktop.

It should be noted that you don't necessarily need to install apt to fix the multimedia problem on SUSE, but it's probably the most beneficial way to get it done. You can easily remove the offending packages and install new ones not provided by SUSE, but by using apt, you'll get the benefit of having a much larger package base available to you... something that SUSE has suffered from for a very long time. With or without apt, let's get things going with this HOWTO.
Unix+clones Making Web Browsing Easy For The Tiny Screen
Post date: August 9, 2005, 15:08 Category: Network Views: 73
Tutorial quote: An avalanche of content will soon appear in the palm of your hand.

Tiny screens are showing up everywhere in PDAs and cell phones. Many are equipped with some form of network device and a browser, so it's not hard to see what's coming down the pike.

Late model PDAs, like my HP iPAQ 3715 no longer suffer from insufficient computing power, lack of memory or having to rely on pricey external 802.11b cards. The little machine is quick to boot up and can handle many daily business functions.

Even though it runs a version of Internet Explorer, jumping onto an access point and browsing web pages is fast and useful.

In this edition, I'll share my observations on things you might consider when converting LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) applications or web pages, for use on the tiny screen. I'll approach the issues from an iPAQ user perspective and focus on convenience and making the user's life easy.
SuSe User-Mode Linux
Post date: December 8, 2005, 08:12 Category: Software Views: 137
Tutorial quote: One of the largest efforts involved with software engineering is testing the software to make sure that it works as designed. Testing can require several different types of system configurations and could require multiple instances of Linux. One way to create this type of environment is to use a virtual machine.

User-Mode Linux (UML) is a fully functional Linux kernel. It runs its own scheduler and virtual memory (VM) system, relying on the host kernel for hardware support. It includes virtual block, network, and serial devices to provide an environment that is almost as full-featured as a hardware-based machine. UML cannot destroy the host machine. Furthermore, the UML block devices, also called disks, can be files on the native Linux file system, so you cannot affect the native block devices. This is very useful when you're testing and debugging block operations.
Gentoo Proftpd with mysql authentication, software qouta, traffic shaper and SSL
Post date: May 26, 2005, 13:05 Category: Network Views: 105
Tutorial quote: A short, but detailed howto about installing ProFTPD with all the bells and whistles on Gentoo.
Linux The Serial Console
Post date: April 14, 2005, 09:04 Category: Hardware Views: 71
Tutorial quote: In these modern times, a hardworking admin might be tempted to turn her back on the Old Ways, and indulge in increasingly exotic methods of interfacing with servers: SSH over ethernet, USB, Firewire, wireless, infrared, KVM switches, VNC, VPN... next stop: direct neural implants.

There's one old timer that still has useful place in the admin's tool kit: the serial console. Sure, it's slow and funky. But there are times it can be a real lifesaver. When nothing else works, it's a direct pipeline into your system. It's simple and cheap. You don't need to install drivers or expansion cards, it's just there.

Administration via serial console is common in data centers. Just imagine the nightmare of trying to connect all those rack units to keyboards and displays. The cabling can be extended to a nice comfortable ops center (well, an ops center, anyway). (This Lantronix Console Manager is an example of the type of device used to administer these.)

There are a number of ways to make the physical connection. You can connect an external modem--the kind us old timers fondly refer to as "real" modems--and do remote administration via dialup. It couldn't be any simpler, just dial direct. Or grab a null modem cable, connect to a laptop or a nearby workstation, and you have an instant terminal.
Debian Howto install pureftpd on a debian machine
Post date: April 9, 2006, 22:04 Category: Software Views: 28
Tutorial quote: The target of this tutorial is to have a successful installation of the ftp-daemon pureftpd working with virtual user accounts. You should already know about installing pureftpd.
RedHat RH 9.0 Apache 2.0.47 + Tomcat 4.1.27 HOWTO
Post date: April 9, 2006, 10:04 Category: Software Views: 15
Tutorial quote: Building an Apache HTTP + Tomcat environment is five major steps.
Debian Creating self signed SSL Certificates Using Openssl
Post date: February 2, 2006, 20:02 Category: Network Views: 46
Tutorial quote: Easy howto on how to create self signed ssl certificate for apache.