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Unix+clones Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 93
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
OSX Optimizing Mac OS X performance
Post date: January 18, 2006, 11:01 Category: Optimizing Views: 58
Tutorial quote: This FAQ provides recommendations for optimizing MacŪ OS X performance. Additionally, it provides advice and links to advice for troubleshooting certain Mac OS X performance problems.
Unix+clones Comparing MySQL performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 57
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
OSX Enhancing Performance Of Mac OS X
Post date: December 29, 2005, 09:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 61
Tutorial quote: There are certain things that would help Mac OS X perform well and be more responsive (you could say 'snappy'). Here are some ways to eliminate the typical bottlenecks.
Unix+clones Apple's G5 versus x86, Mac OS X versus Linux
Post date: June 3, 2005, 23:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 117
Tutorial quote: This article is written solely from the frustration that I could not get a clear picture on what the G5 and Mac OS X are capable of. So, be warned; this is not an all-round review. It is definitely the worst buyer’s guide that you can imagine. This article cares about speed, performance, and nothing else! No comments on how well designed the internals are, no elaborate discussions about user friendliness, out-of-the-box experience and other subjective subjects. But we think that you should have a decent insight to where the G5/Mac OS X combination positions itself when compared to the Intel & AMD world at the end of this article.
Unix+clones Considerations for the system architect: Performance
Post date: April 20, 2005, 06:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 86
Tutorial quote: For many developers and engineers, performance is often an afterthought. But when a product functions as designed and has proven stability and the right feature mix, success in the marketplace often depends upon performance. Architectural decisions define the ultimate feasible performance of any product. In this article, learn how performance-monitoring technology initially developed for mainframes can help you improve your own code's performance.
Debian How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster
Post date: March 31, 2006, 14:03 Category: Software Views: 13
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5 cluster with three nodes: two storage nodes and one management node. This cluster is load-balanced by a high-availability load balancer that in fact has two nodes that use the Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).

In this document I use Debian Sarge for all nodes. Therefore the setup might differ a bit for other distributions. The MySQL version I use in this setup is 5.0.19. If you do not want to use MySQL 5, you can use MySQL 4.1 as well, although I haven't tested it.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
Gentoo PureFTPD with MySQL Auth + MyPhpAdmin
Post date: June 11, 2005, 04:06 Category: Network Views: 155
Tutorial quote: Simple guide on how to setup Pure-FTPD on Gentoo with MySQL authorization.
Linux Benchmarking Filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 95
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
OSX Mac OS X Server Administrator's Guide
Post date: June 8, 2005, 01:06 Category: System Views: 90
Tutorial quote: Includes information on how Mac OS X Server software works
and strategies for using it with your network