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Search results for Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

FreeBSD Configuring virtual domains with Cyrus+Postfix in FreeBSD 5.4
Post date: November 30, 2005, 22:11 Category: Software Views: 152
Tutorial quote: Cyrus IMAP is an efficient IMAP server capable of handling a large number of accounts. Its biggest drawback is getting it installed and configured. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide on how to use Cyrus with the Postfix mail transfer agent (MTA). I tested these instructions with FreeBSD 5.4.

Postfix is a replacement for sendmail, the stock MTA that comes in FreeBSD. It is easier to configure and manage than sendmail. If you depend on sendmail, you can still look at the article for the Cyrus part, but you'll need to look elsewhere for the MTA configuration.

Unless otherwise instructed, perform all operations in this tutorial as root. You will need to use the port system. If you are new to it, check Chapter 4 of the FreeBSD Handbook.
Debian Software RAID and Encrypted Filesystem Benchmarks
Post date: January 25, 2006, 18:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 65
Tutorial quote: Both tests use bonnie++ to test the disks.

- Files Test: create, destroy, and stat 20,000 files in sequential and random order. File sizes are random between 0K and 15k. All files are created in a single directory.
- IO Test: read, write, rewrite, and seek in three 1GB size files.
- Load: all tests are starting with 0 cpu load. Load was then measured every 2 seconds for the duration of the test and averaged over all measurements.
FreeBSD FreeBSD Networking Basics
Post date: April 12, 2005, 20:04 Category: Network Views: 69
Tutorial quote: Beginners to Unix-like operating systems such as FreeBSD are often stymied by their network settings. Sure, the install process may have set up your NIC for you, but where do you go to view these settings, and how do you proceed if your NIC stops working? Since networking is such an integral part of computing, this article will demonstrate how to verify, configure, and optimize your network settings.
Unix+clones Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 93
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
Unix+clones Comparing MySQL performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 57
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
FreeBSD Upgrading FreeBSD
Post date: April 1, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 14
Tutorial quote: This document started as a follow up to The Ultimate Multimedia Server Guide and how to go about keeping your server up to date and patched with the latest O/S patches and security patches. The other reason for this document was to try and create an easy to follow update guide for the not so Unix savvy users that visit my website from time to time. My first time trying to upgrade FreeBSD from sources went well but trying to understand and piece together all the other documentation was more of a daunting task than actually upgrading.
SuSe A Fresh Approach - SUSE 10.1 package management
Post date: May 12, 2006, 09:05 Category: System Views: 4
Tutorial quote: In SUSE 9.x and 10.0 the default package management software was the software management module and yast online update ( YOU ) in YaST2 and the susewatcher system tray applet. The susewatcher applet would faithfully report any security or system updates and would let you launch YOU to download and apply the updates. For third party software you could add online repositories to the installation sources module and ultimately you could manage all your software from the software management module, again in YaST2.
Debian Aggregating network interfaces
Post date: February 12, 2006, 02:02 Category: Network Views: 43
Tutorial quote: Using more than one hard drive to achieve better performance and fault tolerance is very common. Less well known is that it's also possible to aggregate more than one network interface into a single logical interface. In Linux, this is handled by the bonding driver. Benefits of doing this are much the same as the benefits of aggregating discs using RAID: if one device dies, your server carries on working and by using two devices in parallel, performance can be improved.
Debian Creating .deb-Packages With Checkinstall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 48
Tutorial quote: Checkinstall is a nice tool to create simple .deb-packages that you can use in your local network (e.g. if you have to install the same piece of software on multiple computers running Debian). It lets you compile and install software from the sources like before, but with the difference that you end up with a simple Debian package which also means that you can easily uninstall the software you just compiled by running dpkg -r!

I will demonstrate the use of checkinstall by compiling and installing the anti-virus software ClamAV on a Debian system.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
FreeBSD Installing ProFTPD
Post date: August 26, 2005, 09:08 Category: Network Views: 144
Tutorial quote: This document is about replacing the standard ftpd from the FreeBSD kernel with the fancier ProFTPd.