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Search results for Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

FreeBSD Installing FreeBSD on IBM Netvista S40
Post date: May 8, 2005, 17:05 Category: Installing Views: 162
Tutorial quote: In this note we shall talk about installing FreeBSD on a very interesting and elegant machine: IBM Netvista S40. In its creator own terminology, it is "legacy-free". The computer has no parallel, serial, AT keyboard, nor PS/2 mouse ports. No floppy controller either. Instead, it has 5 USB ports (2 frontal and 3 rear) connected to a single USB controller. Besides these USB ports, the system only counts with standard video and audio connectors. The video controller is Intel 82810E SVGA and audio chip is Intel ICH 82801AA, both integrated onboard. The CPU is Intel PIII at 866MHz. The machine is further equipped with a fast Intel Pro PCI network adapter containing a PXE/RIPL boot prom. A quiet 20G Quantum Fireball HDD and a Liteon ATAPI CD-ROM, both connected as masters, constitute the storage subsystem. The case is Flex ATX, a small form factor.
Debian An apt-get primer
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: System Views: 90
Tutorial quote: If any single program defines the Debian Linux project, that program is apt-get. apt-get is Debian's main tool for installing and removing software. Working with the .deb package format, apt-get offers sophisticated package management that few Red Hat Package Manager RPM-based distributions can match.

Besides the convenience, an advantage of apt-get is that it reduces the chances of falling into dependency hell, that limbo where software installation fails for lack of another piece of software, whose installation fails for lack of another piece of software, and so on. If you know how Debian's archive system works, and how to choose the sources that apt-get uses, and use a few precautions in your upgrades, then the chances are that dependency problems will never bedevil you. Should you descend into dependency hell anyway, apt-get offers useful tools for climbing out of it.
FreeBSD Building a FreeBSD Build System
Post date: April 14, 2006, 20:04 Category: System Views: 24
Tutorial quote: When you finish this article, you will have an unbeatable update system. Even mergemaster will work faster. You will have an update system in which a machine update/upgrade will take less than 10 minutes.
FreeBSD Using FreeBSD's ACLs
Post date: September 29, 2005, 13:09 Category: Security Views: 152
Tutorial quote: Five years ago (gee, has it really been that long?), I wrote a series of articles on understanding Unix permissions. Since then, FreeBSD has implemented something known as ACLs (Access Control Lists).

ACLs came to BSD as part of the TrustedBSD project. As the name suggests, they give a user finer access control over permissions.
Debian Setup an IPv6 Masquerade Box Under Debian Through IPv4
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Network Views: 76
Tutorial quote: Configuring IPv6 (over IPv4) under Debian, quite frankly, couldn't be easier. I had a somewhat difficult time in setting it up myself, but that was only because the guides I'd seen on the WWW were designed for operating systems such as FreeBSD. Thus, I have decided to write this document to promote IPv6, and to relieve the frustration of those looking for a no-fuss way to quickly configure IPv6 under Debian.
Mepis Upgrading to Linux from Windows 98
Post date: April 18, 2005, 03:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 134
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial-style article, Michael C. Barnes outlines a strategy to avoid costly upgrades from Windows 98 to Windows XP -- in terms of both hardware and software -- by upgrading to Linux, instead. Barnes reviews the typical requirements of computers used for relatively generic purposes, and shows how to give a new lease on life to aging laptops and PCs by replacing obsolete OSes such as Windows 98 with a combination of Linux, free open source applications, and inexpensive commercial software.
Fedora+Core Enhancing Apache with mod_security
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Security Views: 93
Tutorial quote: Like probably quite a few of you, I run and admin some websites (some for fun, some for work), and as many of you surely do, some of these websites are mounted on a CMS. CMS are not the 8th wonder of the world, however some of them are pretty good, and they save you a lot of time by automating tons of tasks... however, as in every piece of code there exists, all of them are insecure and buggy (in fact, every piece of software is insecure and buggy to a degree)

So, searching for tools and ways to prevent people from breaking into my site without authorization, I began my search and found a great piece of software: mod_security for Apache.
Unix+clones Squeeze Your Gigabit NIC for Top Performance
Post date: June 24, 2005, 21:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 135
Tutorial quote: Many new workstations and servers are coming with integrated gigabit network cards, but quite a few people soon discover that they can't transfer data much faster than they did with 100 Mb/s network cards. Multiple factors can affect your ability to transfer at higher speeds, and most of them revolve around operating system settings. In this article we will discuss the necessary steps to make your new gigabit-enabled server obtain close to gigabit speeds in Linux, FreeBSD, and Windows.
FreeBSD Build your own gateway firewall
Post date: April 11, 2006, 17:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 24
Tutorial quote: Learn how to build your own gateway firewall using FreeBSD and old PC parts. The firewall will consist of the PF firewall, Snort IDS, various IPS applications, Squid proxy, and some intuitive web interfaces for auditing. The cost of this project should be between free and $200 depending on your resourcefulness. I built mine for free using spare parts that were stockpiled in personal storage and parts that the USMC was throwing away, but you can build one from used and/or new parts for dirt cheap.
Unix+clones The 'no-configuration, only-active-when-needed' SSH VPN
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: So, we started thinking about how we might set up a VPN between the application server and our internal software mirror. The only requirement is that the VPN be initiated from the "inside-out" and that the connection is only active for as long as we need to use. In other words, it would only be active during an administration session. Ideally, it wouldn't be a lot of work to setup and tear down either.

SSH to the rescue...

Fortunately, SSH client and server come with support for this out of the box, requiring no additional software to be installed, and no configuration changes. On the server side, sshd, the setting "AllowTcpForwarding" defaults to "yes" unless your sshd_config file explicitly disables it. On the client side, all you have to do is request the forwarding.