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Debian Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel
Post date: December 29, 2005, 02:12 Category: System Views: 92
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
Unix+clones Apache Maintenance Basics
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: Software Views: 40
Tutorial quote: You've downloaded and configured your Apache server and are ready to move on to the next project. Can it really be left to fend for itself in a darkened room?

Yes. To some degree, anyway. With the exception of configuration testing, once Apache is up, you likely need never think about how the Web server is running.

On the other hand, completely ignoring your Apache installation would be foolhardy. Doing some regular checks and maintenance on your Apache installation helps identify any issues usually before they even become issues and helps you stay up date with the latest security and performance patches. This article covers some of the major steps and maintenance tasks that should be regularly undertaken while the Apache system is running.
Debian Creating .deb-Packages With Checkinstall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 48
Tutorial quote: Checkinstall is a nice tool to create simple .deb-packages that you can use in your local network (e.g. if you have to install the same piece of software on multiple computers running Debian). It lets you compile and install software from the sources like before, but with the difference that you end up with a simple Debian package which also means that you can easily uninstall the software you just compiled by running dpkg -r!

I will demonstrate the use of checkinstall by compiling and installing the anti-virus software ClamAV on a Debian system.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
Debian Firebird database Configuration
Post date: May 5, 2006, 13:05 Category: Installing Views: 4
Tutorial quote: Firebird is a relational database offering many ANSI SQL-99 features that runs on Linux, Windows, and a variety of Unix platforms. Firebird offers excellent concurrency, high performance, and powerful language support for stored procedures and triggers. It has been used in production systems, under a variety of names since 1981.

Firebird is a commercially independent project of C and C++ programmers, technical advisors and supporters developing and enhancing a multi-platform relational database management system based on the source code released by Inprise Corp (now known as Borland Software Corp) under the InterBase Public License v.1.0 on 25 July, 2000.
FreeBSD Configuring virtual domains with Cyrus+Postfix in FreeBSD 5.4
Post date: November 30, 2005, 22:11 Category: Software Views: 152
Tutorial quote: Cyrus IMAP is an efficient IMAP server capable of handling a large number of accounts. Its biggest drawback is getting it installed and configured. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide on how to use Cyrus with the Postfix mail transfer agent (MTA). I tested these instructions with FreeBSD 5.4.

Postfix is a replacement for sendmail, the stock MTA that comes in FreeBSD. It is easier to configure and manage than sendmail. If you depend on sendmail, you can still look at the article for the Cyrus part, but you'll need to look elsewhere for the MTA configuration.

Unless otherwise instructed, perform all operations in this tutorial as root. You will need to use the port system. If you are new to it, check Chapter 4 of the FreeBSD Handbook.
Gentoo Fbsplash on gentoo
Post date: April 12, 2005, 01:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 177
Tutorial quote: Gensplash is a project started by Spock whose aim is to create a set of tools which could enrich the Gentoo boot process by displaying messages, animations, progress bars, etc. An explanation of the various things named *splash (bootsplash, gensplash, fbsplash, and splashutils) and how they relate to each other, can be found at Spock's Gensplash site.

Fbsplash is part of the gensplash project. According to fbsplash's documentation, "the framebuffer splash is a kernel feature that allows displaying a background picture on selected consoles and switching the first console to the so-called silent mode, while booting/rebooting/shutting down the system." The fbsplash device is accessed through the /dev/fbsplash device node. For fbsplash to work, a frame buffer device is required.
RedHat Taking advantage of SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Security Views: 130
Tutorial quote: The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 debuts the first commercially supported inclusion of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). An installation of Red Hat's latest enterprise operating system has SELinux installed and enabled by default. In the past SELinux has been criticized for a lack of commercial support, many big sites were unable to use it due to the lack of support (Fedora Core 3 doesn't have the support that they require). Now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, SELinux is a supported part of the OS, and such objections to the use of SELinux have gone away. SELinux is now widely regarded as being suitable for the largest sites.
Linux Building a Linux Cluster, Part 1
Post date: April 17, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 65
Tutorial quote: Linux clusters have escaped. As the general popularity of the Linux operating system increases, more complex solutions built with it are becoming increasingly common in the "traditional" (more conservative) IT world. Linux computer clusters, whose provenance was originally universities and research institutions such as the U.S. National Laboratories, are showing up in increasing numbers as high-performance computing solutions within such areas as oil and gas exploration, computer-aided engineering, visualization, and software development. Linux clusters providing highly-available web, mail, and other infrastructure services are also increasingly common. If past computing history is any indicator of future trends, widespread use of Linux clusters in the mainstream IT world cannot be far behind.
Gentoo Build your own Gentoo rescue LiveCD and USBStick
Post date: June 20, 2005, 00:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 153
Tutorial quote: I've written this how-to after trying to find a boot medium for my home gateway machine which could be used for system rescues and even installing Gentoo. Why not use the standard Gentoo Live CD you ask? Well my gateway machine is one of those small, silent and cool running mini-itx machines (http://www.mini-itx.com) and has no CDROM or floppy drive. I needed some way of getting Gentoo on there and some way of easily rescuing it when the need arises. The good news is that these VIA mini-tix machines are USB bootable and I much preferred the idea of having a little USB drive/stick that I could push into any USB bootable machine and boot into Linux rather than having to set up a PXE networked boot environment (which is also supported).
Linux Port Knocking
Post date: April 16, 2005, 06:04 Category: Network Views: 38
Tutorial quote: Firewall administrators are challenged to balance flexibility and security when designing a comprehensive rule set. A firewall should provide protection against malfeasants, while allowing trusted users to connect. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to filter out the bad guys, because filtering on the basis of IP addresses and ports does not distinguish connecting users. Bad guys can and do come from trusted IP addresses. Open ports remain a necessary vulnerability: they allow connections to applications but also may turn into open doors for attack. This article presents a new security system, termed port knocking, in which trusted users manipulate firewall rules by transmitting information across closed ports.