Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Using the 'snort' Intrusion Detection System

Linux Mastering the Enterprise Volume Management System
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: System Views: 62
Tutorial quote: The Enterprise Volume Management System, or EVMS, is a disk, partition, and file system manager for Linux that claims to be a comprehensive tool for all disk management tasks. I ran across EVMS and found the idea appealing, so I decided to try it out. I've been working with it for a couple of weeks now, and this article describes what I found.
Debian Debian RAID 1/5 system installer
Post date: May 28, 2005, 18:05 Category: Installing Views: 193
Tutorial quote: Instructions for installing a very clean Debian GNU/Linux system that boots from RAID 1, and has RAID 1 or RAID 5 root and data filesystems.

The examples assume two identical harddrives, sda and sdb, on which after a small boot partition, 1 GB is used for swap, 25 GB is used for the root filesystem and everything else is for a big "data" partition that will hold non-system stuff.
Debian Giving your Xen instances a working X setup
Post date: January 2, 2006, 23:01 Category: Software Views: 91
Tutorial quote: Xen, the virtualisation system, is a great tool for running fresh copies of an operating system. However it doesn't allow you to run X11 programs. Here we can fix that with the help of VNC.
OpenBSD Apache - Serving up the Web
Post date: April 11, 2006, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 19
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.
Linux The PartImage Handbook
Post date: May 21, 2005, 11:05 Category: Software Views: 43
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
Solaris Restoring a Sun system using JumpStart technology
Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Installing Views: 96
Tutorial quote: If a server crash and the file systems are corrupted or totally destroyed, then the only way to recover the data is to restore from backups. If it is only user data that is corrupted, the task is in general simple, but if the system disk fails, then there is a little bit more work involved in order to to recover the system. This article explains how to backup Sun systems using ufsrestore over NFS, and how to use Sun's JumpStart technology to restore Sun servers and workstations over the network.
Unix+clones Unattended, Encrypted, Incremental Network Backups
Post date: August 12, 2005, 14:08 Category: Network Views: 81
Tutorial quote: This article describes a complete system for creating a centralised backup system, complete with strong encryption. Incremental backups are used to minimize the bandwidth, and time, used.
RedHat Getting back my GNOME desktop from the clutches of the GNOME configuration system
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Desktop Views: 86
Tutorial quote: My problem: as a user I managed to lock myself out of my GNOME desktop though a careless setting of Preferences-> Resolution.

In determining my solution I learned some key lessons about the GNOME configuration system.
RedHat Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools
Post date: June 3, 2005, 12:06 Category: System Views: 172
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.
Linux Build a Home Terabyte Backup System Using Linux
Post date: November 30, 2005, 20:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 84
Tutorial quote: A terabyte-plus backup and storage system is now an affordable option for Linux users. This article discusses options for building and configuring an inexpensive, expandable, Linux-based backup server.