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Unix+clones Squeeze Your Gigabit NIC for Top Performance
Post date: June 24, 2005, 21:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 135
Tutorial quote: Many new workstations and servers are coming with integrated gigabit network cards, but quite a few people soon discover that they can't transfer data much faster than they did with 100 Mb/s network cards. Multiple factors can affect your ability to transfer at higher speeds, and most of them revolve around operating system settings. In this article we will discuss the necessary steps to make your new gigabit-enabled server obtain close to gigabit speeds in Linux, FreeBSD, and Windows.
Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part II
Post date: May 24, 2005, 14:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 135
Tutorial quote: As we discussed in last week's article, for most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. The default workstation that evolved has existed mostly for use by developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. In addition, it performs similar to how many UNIX workstations work, which can seem slow.

In this article, we continue to look at the Linux desktop in a different light. Here, we think of it as a computer system with a fast interface that we can optimize for the knowledge worker and consumer.
Gentoo Darcs - easy VCS alternative to CVS
Post date: June 21, 2005, 19:06 Category: Network Views: 74
Tutorial quote: This is a brief introduction to Darcs - a distributed SCM system and a healthy alternative to CVS. It will show you an easy, more modern approach to VCS. The project I contribute to (formerly XWT, renamed to Vexi) has greatly benefitted from moving to Darcs from CVS because now we can make rapid progress without the fear of making bad commits to the server or the server being down. People can code and pull other's code at their own convenience.
OpenSUSE Hacking OpenSUSE
Post date: December 3, 2005, 12:12 Category: System Views: 133
Tutorial quote: There's more to SUSE Linux than simply installing it and going to work. To get the most from the operating system, you'll probably want to do some post-install fine tuning. This article by Jem Matzan explains how to: add download sources to YaST; install the Mozilla Thunderbird email client; add support for Java, Flash, Acrobat, Windows Media, MP3s, and RealMedia; play DVDs -- and more. It serves as a useful supplement to Steven J. Rosen's excellent how-to, "Installing SUSE Linux 10 on a Laptop," recently published here on DesktopLinux.com. Enjoy . . . !
SuSe The Perfect Setup - SUSE 9.2 (server)
Post date: April 12, 2005, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 171
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to be taken to setup a SUSE 9.2 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.). In addition to that I will show how to use Debian's package manager apt on an rpm-based system because it takes care of package dependencies automagically which can save a lot of trouble.
Gentoo Shoutcast Streaming Server Guide
Post date: May 4, 2005, 13:05 Category: Network Views: 70
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up a Shoutcast streaming music server. It covers situations when the server and transcoder are on the same machine, and when they are on different macines. The entire installation should take between 15-30 minutes at most.

The system works by taking mp3 files and feeding them into a transcoder. The transcoder in turn re-encodes the music and passes it to the server. The server receives the stream and when listeners connect, the server splits the stream so that each listener can hear the mp3's.
Unix+clones Have a Bash With This Linux Shell
Post date: April 15, 2005, 01:04 Category: Programming Views: 46
Tutorial quote: Any Linux administrator who wishes to remain sane relies heavily on scripting to automate routine tasks, customize jobs, and build the plumbing that connects the different utilities that make a Linux system run smoothly. The Linux world is chock-full of scripting languages: Perl, Python, PHP, Scheme, Tcl, Tk, Ruby, Forth, Smalltalk, Eiffel, and doubtless many more. To get the column started, we'll look at shell scripting with Bash, and scripting with Python and Perl.
SuSe Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9
Post date: June 22, 2005, 05:06 Category: System Views: 130
Tutorial quote: Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) requires an understanding of the login process, including local account files, system accounts, and managing identities.

Using a console shell or the graphical environment are two possible methods of working on a SLES machine.

Finding your way around a SLES installation requires an in-depth knowledge of the filesystem layout. Essential filesystem components are documented and explained in this chapter. Basic filesystem permissions are also described.
Linux Configure Multiple Network Profiles on Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 30
Tutorial quote: Mobile Linux users face some interesting (OK, vexing) challenges when they want to plug into different networks. Any Linux system will easily support all manner of networking profiles--dialup, ISDN, Ethernet, wireless--the tricky bit is configuration. Manually re-configuring a PC for every connection is low on most users' lists of "fun things to do." You can be an ace scripting guru and fiddle up something yourself, or you can find a nice ready-made utility to do the work for you. Unfortunately, I have not found a universal utility to do this. However, there are a lot of utilities specific to various distributions, and an assortment of other utilities.
FreeBSD Using a jail as a virtual machine
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: System Views: 83
Tutorial quote: This article shows you how I created a jail for the OSW website. It runs in a jail on the same system as this website. I originally did this install back in November 2003 and the notes from that session form the basis of this article. I have need to recreate the jail now as we recently had an HDD failure.

A jail is useful for many purposes. In my case, I wanted to give the OSW project a place to run their websites, mailing lists, etc, but at the same time keep them isolated from the rest of the machine. In short, it gives them a virtual machine, and it gives me peace of mind knowing that I have less to worry about with respect to the rest of the machine.