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Search results for Using the GNU Privacy Guard

Debian Gnu Privacy Guard (GPG)
Post date: March 21, 2006, 14:03 Category: Security Views: 31
Tutorial quote: GNU Privacy Guard, or GPG, is a free replacement for the famous encryption tool PGP written by Phil Zimmermann. It is a tool for secure communication and data storage. It can be used to encrypt data and to create digital signatures. Here we'll provide a quick introduction to generating a key-pair and using it for basic tasks.
Unix+clones Using the GNU Privacy Guard
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Software Views: 38
Tutorial quote: Tonight we will investigate the gnupg utility (version 1.07). I will be running it on an OpenBSD 3.2 system but, as usual, any unix-like system should not display any significant differences. I will assume that GPG is already installed.

The GNU Privacy Guard can be regarded as a complete replacement for the popular PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) software. The difference between the two is that GnuPG does not have any licensing restrictions and it also runs on more platforms. They are both open source products. Although owned by a commercial entity, a freeware version of PGP is available (although only for Windows and Macintosh).

In a nutshell, what all this software does is allow two parties to communicate securely. This implies the following:
- the message has arrived at its destination unaltered
- the message can only be read by its intended recipient
- the authenticity of the sender has been verified by the recipient
Debian Installing Debian onto USB flash media with everything encrypted
Post date: September 28, 2005, 12:09 Category: Security Views: 228
Tutorial quote: This is a simple procedure for installing Debian GNU/Linux onto a USB key flash media. It includes several configuration changes but tries to stay as close to a default debian install as possible.

This is useful for administrators that need to carry sensitive information or people concerned about their privacy.
Linux Gnu Queue: Linux Clustering Made Easy
Post date: December 22, 2005, 14:12 Category: System Views: 85
Tutorial quote: GNU Queue makes it easy to cluster Linux workstations. If you already know how to control jobs running on your local machine, you already know how to control remote jobs using GNU Queue. You don't even need special privileges to install and run GNU Queue on your cluster--anyone can do it. Once you've discovered how incredibly easy it is to cluster Linux environments with GNU Queue, you'll wonder why organizations continue to spend so much money on comparatively hard-to-cluster Windows NT environments.
FreeBSD Bluetooth Security Review, Part 1
Post date: April 29, 2005, 20:04 Category: Security Views: 66
Tutorial quote: Bluetooth (BT) wireless technology provides an easy way for a wide range of devices to communicate with each other and connect to the Internet without the need for wires, cables and connectors. The technology seams to be very interesting and beneficial, yet it can also be a high threat for the privacy and security of Bluetooth users.
Unix+clones CLI Magic: OpenSSH + Bash
Post date: January 25, 2006, 15:01 Category: Network Views: 30
Tutorial quote: As a system administrator, I have used OpenSSH's piping abilities more times than I can remember. The typical ssh call gets me access to systems for administration with a proven identity, but ssh is capable of so much more. In combination with bash's subshell invocation, OpenSSH can distribute the heavy work, reduce trace interference on a system under test, and make other "impossible" tasks possible. I've even used it to make Microsoft Windows remote administration easier.

In the examples below, I have tried to avoid GNU-specific idioms for tools which have non-GNU counterparts. This practice improves portability of shell scripts in heterogeneous environments.
Linux Roll Your Own Firewall
Post date: March 28, 2006, 16:03 Category: Network Views: 9
Tutorial quote: A comprehensive user friendly guide to setting up your own firewall on GNU/Linux.
Linux Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER
Post date: May 23, 2005, 12:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 56
Tutorial quote: The Linux on POWER platform offers more than one option to produce binary C/C++ code. In addition to supporting both 32- and 64-bit runtime environments simultaneously, Linux on POWER has two compiler collections. The GNU Compiler Collection, or GCC, is consistent with other Linux implementations with specific exceptions for the POWER architecture. GCC is the leading compiler for portability but also features a number of performance enhancements for optimizing code. The IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on POWER is derived from the high performance compiler for AIX but uses the GNU linker and assembler to create ELF objects that are fully compatible with objects produced by GCC. This document provides side-by-side comparisons of how these two compilers are controlled, overviews of what the compilers are capable of, in terms of optimization, and tips for writing code that is more easily optimized with either of these compilers.
Linux How to play DVDs on any x86 GNU/Linux distro
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 76
Tutorial quote: My folks recently bought and sent me two DVDs, but the only DVD player I have is in my Linux-based computer. Using the free software application MPlayer, I was able to watch my videos. I'll walk you through the easy steps required.
Linux Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: Hardware Views: 104
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
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