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OSX A Windows Administrator's Guide to Serving Macs
Post date: December 13, 2005, 06:12 Category: Network Views: 45
Tutorial quote: Are you Mac-savvy? Many Windows administrators and technicians have never had to support Macs on their networks, so the idea of suddenly having a handful of Mac workstations might seem really challenging. Ryan Faas gives you a simple guide to supporting Mac workstations and Mac users within your Windows network.
FreeBSD How I created my own .mac replacement
Post date: February 7, 2006, 16:02 Category: Network Views: 53
Tutorial quote: My .mac subscription is 60 days from renewal so I have to ask myself, "how useful is .mac to me?

Is .mac worth it to me? Many of the reasons I don't find .mac useful are the same reasons I encourage others to use .mac. One has to keep in mind that I'm not an "average" computer user. My needs are different and Apple wouldn't make any money trying to sell a .mac like service to guys like me. This is not an "I hate .mac" site but rather an explanation of the motivation and methods I used to provide myself with comparable services that are more usable to me. I publish it so that others may benefit from what I have learned.

This is published to help others, but don't expect free support from the author. Support requests that arrive without monetary compensation for my time will almost certainly be ignored. Instead, try using the support forums and maybe someone will help you out.

To understand why I did this, you might want to read about my use of .mac services.

Project Goals:

Retain the useful features: Regardless of whether or not I renew my subscription, I want to retain the features I have found most useful (iDisk, iSync (between computers), iCal sharing, and Backup).

Enhance the useful features: Simply retaining the useful features would be an utter failure. The most value can be found in addressing the shortcomings of each feature. For iDisk, speed and disk space are the impediments to it's usefulness. iSync already works quite well. iCal sharing works well but publish and subscribe updates are sloooow. Backup is hamstrung by the iDisk space issue.
Unix+clones Command your network with Kaboodle
Post date: June 28, 2005, 05:06 Category: Network Views: 91
Tutorial quote: Quite often setting up a local network is much easier than managing it. Even technically challenged users can figure out how to connect a couple of computers and a printer. However, tasks like maintenance, troubleshooting, and remote secure connections require more than just "which-cable-goes-where" knowledge. You need something like Kaboodle, a nifty tool that can help you to manage your local network like a pro.

Kaboodle allows you to visualize your local network, control computers on it via VNC, and connect to other Kaboodle-enabled networks. Kaboodle was developed for Windows, but according to its Web site, it will happily run under Wine on Linux and FreeBSD.
Unix+clones Learn REXX fast
Post date: August 31, 2005, 21:08 Category: Programming Views: 114
Tutorial quote: If you’ve programmed under IBM operating systems, you’ve undoubtedly heard of Rexx. Rexx is the scripting and command language IBM bundles with all its mainframe, mid-range, and lower-end operating systems. What you might not be aware of is that Rexx also runs on almost every other operating system in the known universe. You can download Rexx free for all versions of Windows®, Linux, UNIX®, BSD, Mac OS, and DOS, and many other systems. It even runs on the three major operating systems for handheld devices: Windows CE, Palm OS, and Symbian/EPOC32.

What this means is, if you learn Rexx, you’ll know a scripting language that runs everywhere from mainframes to handhelds—and everything in between. Rexx is a general-purpose language that's powerful enough for mainframes yet flexible enough for other platforms. Best of all, Rexx is easy to learn.
Unix+clones Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 93
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
Unix+clones Version Control with Subversion (Online book)
Post date: April 27, 2005, 23:04 Category: Software Views: 53
Tutorial quote: This is the online home of Version Control with Subversion, a free book about Subversion, a new version control system designed to supplant CVS. As you may have guessed from the layout of this page, this book is published by O'Reilly Media.
OSX The Last iPod Video Guide You’ll Ever Need
Post date: January 10, 2006, 02:01 Category: Multimedia Views: 93
Tutorial quote: I was recently inspired to create a guide for Mac users who just got themselves a brand new iPod! We’ll go over all the options you’ve got and how to convert absolutely anything and everything: DVDs, TiVo video, messy AVIs, muxed MPEGs and more to iPod compatible video - all within OS X. Along the way, you’ll learn a couple of iPod tips and tricks, too. Don’t worry if you don’t know what a muxed MPEG is. We’ll get to that later!
Yellow+Dog Installing Linux on the Mac mini
Post date: May 11, 2005, 08:05 Category: Installing Views: 112
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
SuSe Xgl on SUSE 10.1 for Gnome and KDE with NVidia Graphics Cards
Post date: May 12, 2006, 09:05 Category: Desktop Views: 6
Tutorial quote: Perhaps the most interesting eye-candy introduced to a mainstream Linux distribution is that of the Xgl 3D desktop environment. Naturally, when seen, it fosters the thought, "How can I do that on my own desktop?" I'll be honest with you, it's not quite as point-and-click as some of the other desktop niceties that we've discussed in the past, such as gdesklets or the gkrellm monitors. That in mind, if you're interested in getting Xgl installed and running on your desktop, you've found the right place. We'll take it a bit at a time and make sure we get you set up. First of all, I need to make sure that you are using this tutorial for a machine running either SUSE Linux 10.1 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10, and that you have an NVidia video card. With that, let's get going.
FreeBSD Using FreeBSD's ACLs
Post date: September 29, 2005, 13:09 Category: Security Views: 152
Tutorial quote: Five years ago (gee, has it really been that long?), I wrote a series of articles on understanding Unix permissions. Since then, FreeBSD has implemented something known as ACLs (Access Control Lists).

ACLs came to BSD as part of the TrustedBSD project. As the name suggests, they give a user finer access control over permissions.