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Search results for Xen Disk I/O benchmarking: NetBSD dom0 vs Linux dom0

Unix+clones Xen Disk I/O benchmarking: NetBSD dom0 vs Linux dom0
Post date: April 21, 2005, 05:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 1052 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Xen is a relatively new technology to enable several virtual machines (domU) to run on one computer. The purpose of this article is to determine what operating system (NetBSD or Linux) should be selected as domain 0 (dom0) operating system to get the best performance when running several CPU and disk intensive virtual machines at the same time.
Ubuntu Installing Xen 3.3 With Kernel 2.6.27 On Ubuntu 8.10 (x86_64)
Post date: February 24, 2009, 06:02 Category: Installing Views: 1160 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install Xen 3.3 on an Ubuntu 8.10 host (dom0). Xen 3.3 is available from the Ubuntu 8.10 repositories, but the Ubuntu 8.10 kernels (2.6.27-x) are domU kernels, i.e., they work for Xen guests (domU), but not for the host (dom0). Therefore we need to build our own dom0 kernel. This guide explains how to do this with a 2.6.27 kernel.
Debian How To Enable Networking In Xen Guests On Hetzner's New EQ Servers (Debian Lenny)
Post date: October 27, 2009, 18:10 Category: Network Views: 321 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can enable networking in Xen guests (domU) on Hetzner's new EQ servers. With the new EQ servers, you can get up to three additional IPs that are in the same subnet as the server's main IP. The problem is that these additional IPs are bound to the MAC address of the host system (dom0) - Hetzner's routers will dump IP packets if they come from an unknown MAC address. This means we cannot use Xen's bridged mode, but must switch to Xen's routed mode where the host system (dom0) acts as the gateway for the guests.
Debian The Perfect Xen 3.0.3 Setup For Debian Sarge
Post date: October 22, 2006, 14:10 Category: Emulation Views: 2090 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions about how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system. It shows how to compile Xen, dom0 and domU kernels from the sources as well as how to install Xen from precompiled binaries. Creating guest domains from images is also covered by this article.
CentOS Installing Xen On CentOS 5.0 (i386)
Post date: June 10, 2007, 17:06 Category: Installing Views: 1508 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.0 system (i386). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
Ubuntu Installing Xen On An Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Server From The Ubuntu Repositories
Post date: June 29, 2007, 19:06 Category: Installing Views: 1291 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Ubuntu 7.04) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files or compilation are needed. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).
Debian Virtualization With Xen 3.3.1 On Debian Etch
Post date: February 12, 2009, 06:02 Category: Installing Views: 505 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen 3.3.1 on a Debian Etch (4.0) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware.
CentOS Installing Xen On CentOS 5.2 (i386)
Post date: November 9, 2008, 06:11 Category: Installing Views: 1933 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.2 system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian
Post date: March 31, 2006, 23:03 Category: System Views: 986 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
CentOS Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.3 (x86_64)
Post date: May 17, 2009, 08:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1535 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.3 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.