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Unix+clones Execute Commands on Multiple Linux or UNIX Servers part II
Post date: December 28, 2005, 04:12 Category: System Views: 1020 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: I have already covered how to execute commands on multiple Linux or UNIX servers via shell script. The disadvantage of script is commands do not run in parallel on all servers. However, several tools exist to automate this procedure in parallel. With the help of tool called tentakel, you run distributed command execution. It is a program for executing the same command on many hosts in parallel using ssh (it supports other methods too). Main advantage is you can create several sets of servers according requirements. For example webserver group, mail server group, home servers group etc. The command is executed in parallel on all servers in this group (time saving). By default, every result is printed to stdout (screen). The output format can be defined for each group.
Linux Feed Your Virus Worries to a Clam
Post date: April 14, 2005, 08:04 Category: Network Views: 887 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Last week, we looked at how to set up SpamAssassin with Postfix, as part of a lean, mean, spam-killing gateway machine. This week we'll add an anti-virus scanner to our bubbling brew.
Ubuntu KVM Virtualization With Enomalism 2 On An Ubuntu 8.10 Server
Post date: March 31, 2009, 05:03 Category: Installing Views: 694 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Enomalism ECP (Elastic Computing Platform) provides a web-based control panel that lets you design, deploy, and manage virtual machines on one or more host systems (in the case of multiple systems, we speak of a cluster or cloud). This article shows how you can use Enomalism (also know as Enomaly) to manage KVM guests on one Ubuntu 8.10 server.
Fedora KVM Virtualization With Enomalism 2 On A Fedora 10 Server
Post date: April 21, 2009, 05:04 Category: Installing Views: 800 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Enomalism ECP (Elastic Computing Platform) provides a web-based control panel that lets you design, deploy, and manage virtual machines on one or more host systems (in the case of multiple systems, we speak of a cluster or cloud). This article shows how you can use Enomalism (also know as Enomaly) to manage KVM guests on one Fedora 10 server.
Debian A couple of tricks with the secure shell
Post date: September 18, 2006, 08:09 Category: Network Views: 7470 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: One can do a lot more with ssh than use it for remote terminal session. Here we'll show how to copy files using ssh, use ssh as part of a pipe, vnc or samba forwarding via ssh and mounting filesystems using ssh (fuse + sshfs).
Ubuntu Video Surveillance With ZoneMinder On Ubuntu
Post date: September 8, 2007, 19:09 Category: Desktop Views: 3035 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: ZoneMinder is the top Linux video camera security and surveillance solution. In this document I will cover how to get ZoneMinder up and running on Ubuntu 6.06.1 LTS or Dapper Drake with the recent updates included. The surveillance system I am covering here utilizes 4 Dome CCTV cameras hooked up to a single Kodicom kmc-8800 capture card, in addition I also used infra red LEDs so my cameras could see in the dark (honestly I am abit scared to look). ZoneMinder also does a good job with IP Cameras, unfortunately they are considerably expensive in my part of the world, hence 4 cameras would blow my budget.
Debian Easier file renaming with renameutils
Post date: December 8, 2008, 16:12 Category: Software Views: 496 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Ever been faced with a collection of files that need renaming and nearly gone mad from trying to do it manually?
Lots of typing mv, or lots of right click -> rename. Enter qmv, part of renameutils.

Linux Monitoring disk space and usage
Post date: June 17, 2006, 10:06 Category: Software Views: 2092 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Monitoring disk space is a vital part of your job as a UNIX administrator. This article gives you the tools you need to be successful, including the use of df, du, find, and even the use of quotas. Let's get started by taking a look at how useful df can be.
Linux Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 1
Post date: April 15, 2005, 12:04 Category: Network Views: 886 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Your network is growing in size and complexity. It's taking on a life of its own, spreading and growing and absorbing everything in its path. You're tearing your hair out trying to keep track, and your users have somehow discovered your secret phone number and are pestering you with endless questions and demands--where do I find this; I don't want to keep track of a dozen different passwords; nothing works like it should.

Of several possible solutions, consider two: 1) find a new hiding place, or 2) implement an LDAP server. While finding a new hiding place might sound ideal, it's an option we're going to have to save for a future article. This series will instead explain what LDAP is good for, detail how to build an LDAP server, and cover what you can do with it.
Linux Creating Really Teensy ELF Executables for Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 740 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: If you're a programmer who's become fed up with software bloat, then may you find herein the perfect antidote.

This document explores methods for squeezing excess bytes out of simple programs. (Of course, the more practical purpose of this document is to describe a few of the inner workings of the ELF file format and the Linux operating system. But hopefully you can also learn something about how to make really teensy ELF executables in the process.)

Please note that the information and examples given here are, for the most part, specific to ELF executables on a Linux platform running under an Intel-386 architecture. I imagine that a good bit of the information is applicable to other ELF-based Unices, but my experiences with such are too limited for me to say with certainty.

The assembly code that appears in this document is written for use with Nasm. (Besides being more appropriate for our needs, Nasm's syntax beats the hell out of AT&T syntax for anyone who learned x86 assembly language before learning to use Gas.) Nasm is freely available and extremely portable; see http://nasm.sourceforge.net/.

Please also note that if you aren't a little bit familiar with assembly code, you may find parts of this document sort of hard to follow.