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Search results for Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 1

Debian Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel
Post date: December 29, 2005, 01:12 Category: System Views: 1541 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
CentOS The Perfect Setup - OpenVZ with CentOS 4.4
Post date: November 12, 2006, 15:11 Category: System Views: 1986 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This article describes how to prepare a CentOS 4.4 server for OpenVZ virtual machines. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers.
Debian Xen from Backports on Debian Sarge
Post date: August 12, 2006, 13:08 Category: Software Views: 934 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: There is a great howto about installing Xen on Debian Unstable. It is really easy to do and it runs fine. Nevertheless, on production servers, that's not an optimal solution. Debian Unstable has too many updates and things change too often. On production machines, a Xen host system should be stable, secure and should not need much attention. That is where Sarge comes in. If you pull the Xen packages from backports and install them on Debian stable you've got the best of both worlds. Let's do so!
CentOS Installing Xen On CentOS 5.2 (i386)
Post date: November 9, 2008, 06:11 Category: Installing Views: 1936 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.2 system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
CentOS Installing And Using OpenVZ On CentOS 5.2
Post date: July 31, 2008, 06:07 Category: Installing Views: 1783 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare a CentOS 5.2 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernel patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
Fedora Installing And Using OpenVZ On Fedora 9
Post date: July 20, 2008, 04:07 Category: Installing Views: 911 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare a Fedora 9 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernel patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
Ubuntu Installing And Using OpenVZ On Ubuntu 8.10
Post date: November 11, 2008, 05:11 Category: Installing Views: 1102 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare an Ubuntu 8.10 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernel patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
Debian The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian
Post date: March 31, 2006, 23:03 Category: System Views: 988 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
CentOS Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.3 (x86_64)
Post date: May 17, 2009, 08:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1536 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.3 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
FreeBSD Working with gmirror on a Sun Fire X2100 (part 2)
Post date: August 29, 2006, 10:08 Category: System Views: 1170 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Editorial note: This is the followup to Greg's previous piece, and continues where part one left off. It is recommended that you read and understand the content presented in part one before attempting any of the procedures documented here. Now without further ado...