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Search results for Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 1

Debian Using multiple network cards in XEN
Post date: December 10, 2006, 03:12 Category: Emulation Views: 2706 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Xen is great. But installing more than one network card became a pain when I tried it the first time. There are some documents describing the principle but I was unable to find a real life example somewhere else. So this is a summary about how it works here now.
Debian Virtualization With KVM On A Debian Lenny Server
Post date: March 17, 2009, 06:03 Category: Installing Views: 1393 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Debian Lenny server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Debian Xen Live Migration Of An LVM-Based Virtual Machine With iSCSI On Debian Lenny
Post date: April 30, 2009, 06:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1009 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can do a live migration of an LVM-based virtual machine (domU) from one Xen host to the other. I will use iSCSI to provide shared storage for the virtual machines in this tutorial. Both Xen hosts and the iSCSI target are running on Debian Lenny in this article.
RedHat My First Linux Server, Part 2
Post date: April 14, 2005, 17:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1413 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: A file server is a specialized PC that holds large numbers of files that many people on a network can access. It "serves up" files to everyone instead of each person having files on his or her own PC. The good news is that you don't have to be a network guru to set up a basic file server. If you followed the Easy Linux Install steps in Part 1, you are ready to set up a Linux PC as a file server.

While there are many ways to set up a network and a server, this article concentrates on the simplest approaches with the highest chance of quick success.
Debian Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)
Post date: January 21, 2006, 00:01 Category: Software Views: 808 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Ubuntu Installing and configuring FireHOL - Part 2
Post date: September 20, 2006, 17:09 Category: Network Views: 2948 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This is the second part of the introduction to FireHOL article. It covers more advanced topics that you might find useful, such as defining new services, selective filtering, and NAT. Everything is explained in a very detailed fashion.
Linux Building a Virtual Cluster with Xen
Post date: September 27, 2006, 23:09 Category: Emulation Views: 3028 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: It is a common practice to have development and test servers for each production server, so that you can experiment with changes without the fear of breaking anything important, but this is usually not feasible with clusters. So how do you try that new version of your favorite program before committing it to the production cluster? A cheap and convenient possibility is to build a virtual cluster.

Thanks to the Xen virtual machine monitor, you can create a number of virtual machines, all running simultaneously in your computer, install different operating systems in them, or just different configurations, and connect them via (virtual) network cards. Xen is a terrific tool for building virtual Beowulf clusters. It can prove useful when learning or teaching about clusters or for testing new features/software without the fear of causing major damage to an existing cluster.
Ubuntu Installing Xen On An Ubuntu 7.10 Server From The Ubuntu Repositories
Post date: November 6, 2007, 04:11 Category: Installing Views: 1512 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon (Ubuntu 7.10) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files or compilation are needed.
Debian Debian Etch And Xen From The Debian Repository
Post date: May 2, 2007, 17:05 Category: Installing Views: 956 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This guide provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an already working Debian Etch system. You can find all the software used here in the Etch repository, so no external files or compilation are needed.
Proxmox+VE KVM & OpenVZ Virtualization And Cloud Computing With Proxmox VE
Post date: February 17, 2009, 06:02 Category: Installing Views: 3100 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Proxmox VE (virtual environment) is a distribution based on Debian Etch (x86_64); it provides an OpenSource virtualization platform for running virtual machines (OpenVZ and KVM) and comes with a powerful, web-based control panel (it includes a web-based graphical console that you can use to connect to the virtual machines). With Proxmox VE, you can even create a cluster of virtualization hosts and create/control virtual machines on remote hosts from the control panel. Proxmox VE also supports live migration of virtual machines from one host to the other. This guide shows how you can use Proxmox VE to control KVM and OpenVZ virtual machines and how to create a small computing cloud with it.