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Debian Ruby on Rails on Debian
Post date: January 10, 2006, 11:01 Category: Network Views: 853 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Most of you have probably heard of Ruby on Rails and may be wondering what exactly it does and how you can try it for yourself. Put simply, Rails is a web application framework that uses the model-view-controller software design pattern to allow for rapid development of web applications. This article will cover how to install Rails on Debian and how to configure it to work with Apache and a relational database of your choice.
Debian Monitoring your hardware's temperature
Post date: January 5, 2006, 03:01 Category: Software Views: 1064 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Sometimes it is useful to know the temperature of your hardware, to prevent it from frying. This information can easily be found, if your hardware provides the sensors needed, and we have the necessary software.

Most computers come with temperature sensors, which can be used to prevent your hardware from excessive heat. The most important thing to watch is, of course, your CPU temperature. This is where lm-sensors comes in.
Debian Giving your Xen instances a working X setup
Post date: January 2, 2006, 22:01 Category: Software Views: 856 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Xen, the virtualisation system, is a great tool for running fresh copies of an operating system. However it doesn't allow you to run X11 programs. Here we can fix that with the help of VNC.
Debian Spam filtering with Pyzor and SpamBayes
Post date: January 2, 2006, 22:01 Category: Security Views: 945 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Spam appears to be a fact of life for most of the online world at the moment. Here is how I personally handle the filtering of incoming mail, using a combination of Pyzor, SpamBayes and Procmail. These tools each integrate nicely, and work easily with my mail reader of choice: mutt.
Debian Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel
Post date: December 29, 2005, 01:12 Category: System Views: 1540 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
Debian Using the 'snort' Intrusion Detection System
Post date: December 27, 2005, 09:12 Category: Security Views: 1753 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Snort is the leading open source Network Intrusion Detection System and is a valuable addition to the security framework at any site. Even if you are employing lots of preventative measures, such as firewalling, patching, etc., a detection system can give you an assurance that your defences truly are effective, or if not, will give you valuable information about what you need to improve.

Fortunately, there is a good set of snort packages for Debian which takes a lot of the tedious work out of building a useful Network Intrusion Detection System. Before we start on installation, we should review a few details about the networking satack that you're going to need to make sense of the alerts snort will generate. Impatient readers and those who are familiar with the TCP/IP suite of protocols may do now skip to the bit that says Stand alone snort.
Debian Network profiles for a laptop
Post date: December 22, 2005, 18:12 Category: Network Views: 770 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to configure networking in a very pleasant way, so that it works automatically wherever you go. It is adaptable to lots of uses, and may be usefull even if you don't use Wifi but connect to multiple networks.
Debian Burning DVDs on Debian for Newbies
Post date: December 22, 2005, 18:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 1079 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: DVD writers have become so common these days that there is hardly any difference between the price of a CD-writer drive and a DVD-writer drive. So I'm assuming that almost everyone would be buying a DVD writer drive these days. Below are a few tips for newbies on how to burn DVDs on a Debian box using the command line. Other GUI tools like k3b, nautilus burner, etc exists but its always fun to know how to do that stuff from command line.
Debian Creating a Wiki with kwiki
Post date: December 17, 2005, 16:12 Category: Software Views: 833 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Debian Boot Debian from an external firewire drive on PowerPc Mac
Post date: December 14, 2005, 13:12 Category: Installing Views: 774 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Messing with a boot process is a delicate matter even on a Mac. Note that the Debian installer will fail at some point during the procedure.
I offer no warranty and assume no responsibility for whatever loss or damage might be caused to your hardware, software or data.
There are other ways to boot Linux from an external firewire drive documented elsewhere on the net. See the Resources section.

Adding or removing peripherals like usb keys, digital cameras, other external HDs, cdroms etc, or installing/removing devfs, udev, and similar stuff might alter the way Linux sees the firewire drive, i suggest becoming familiar with supplying boot options to yaboot during the boot process. See Man pages of yaboot and yaboot.conf.