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Building a Linux virtual server

Post date: June 9, 2005, 14:06 Category: Software Views: 3568 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the explosive growth of the Internet, the workload on servers providing Web, email, and media services has increased greatly. More and more sites are being challenged to keep up with the growing demands and are employing several techniques to avoid overloading their servers. Building a scalable server on a cluster of computers is one of the solutions that is being effectively put to use. With such a cluster, the increasing requests can be easily managed by simply adding one or more new servers to the existing cluster as required. In this article we will look at setting up one such scalable, network load-balancing server cluster using a virtual server via the Linux Virtual Server Project.
Linux

Performance Tools for Optimizing Linux: Process-Specific CPU

Post date: June 1, 2005, 07:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 3810 Comments
Tutorial quote: The tools to analyze the performance of applications are varied and have existed in one form or another since the early days of UNIX. It is critical to understand how an application is interacting with the operating system, CPU, and memory system to understand its performance. This chapter will help you understand where the bottleneck in your system is occuring, and how to fix it.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part III

Post date: May 31, 2005, 14:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 4979 Comments
Tutorial quote: For desktop and laptop users who want a fast-booting operating system, getting rid of services you do not need can appear to improve performance. Obviously, if you are new to Linux, though, you probably do not know which processes you can get rid of safely nor how to stop them and keep them from restarting at boot time.
Linux

Breaking the SHELL

Post date: May 29, 2005, 01:05 Category: Programming Views: 3857 Comments
Tutorial quote: Shell scripts are a part and parcel of almost all software applications running on UNIX, and the use simply spans from a trivial script, managing automatic database backup to bunch of scripts collaboratively doing complex operation on regular expressions.

Though it's a mere design decision to partition modules between scripts and programming language, but I personally feel that they sometimes come very handy saving lot of time and lines of code, when compared to implementing the same functionality in the programming language in context.And in fact with some exceptions, complexity of a shell script can scale to that of codes in C language. Add to this the power of all those numerous UNIX commands, and just think through, what can be achieved by shell scripts.
Here I will discuss few topics mainly relevant to intermediate shell programmers
Linux

WiFi PDA Meets Linux--Part 3

Post date: May 28, 2005, 22:05 Category: Software Views: 3119 Comments
Tutorial quote: Did you know that your new WiFi-equipped iPAQ can be used as a VoIP communicator? How about your Linux notebook? The program that makes it possible is called Skype and it lets you call other Skype users over the Internet for free. You can also call regular phone numbers for very competitive per-minute rates. As it turns out, Skype is available for both platforms and Windows, too. Although it's not an Open Source solution, it is freely available and fits nicely into our WiFi-PDA-meets-Linux bag of tools.

Join me now to discover how you can use the program on the iPAQ and a Linux notebook.
Linux

Three tools to help you configure iptables

Post date: May 25, 2005, 14:05 Category: Network Views: 3668 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every user whose client connects to the Internet should configure his firewall immediately after installation. Some Linux distributions include firewall configuration as a part of installation, often offering a set of defaults configurations to choose from. However, to ensure that your machine presents the minimum "attack surface" (a measure of the number of vulnerable ports, user accounts, and sockets exposed to attack) to the predatory inhabitants of the Internet, you may need to do some manual configuration of your firewall. Here are three tools that can help.
The Linux kernel (version 2.4 onwards) contains a framework for packet filtering and firewalling using netfilter and iptables. Netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. Iptables is a generic table structure for the definition of rulesets. Each rule within an IP table consists of a number of classifiers (iptables matches) and one connected action (iptables target). Iptables has extensive documentation that can be accessed online or by typing man iptables at the command line. Yet despite the depth of the documentation available for iptables, its complexity can be baffling.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part II

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 4073 Comments
Tutorial quote: As we discussed in last week's article, for most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. The default workstation that evolved has existed mostly for use by developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. In addition, it performs similar to how many UNIX workstations work, which can seem slow.

In this article, we continue to look at the Linux desktop in a different light. Here, we think of it as a computer system with a fast interface that we can optimize for the knowledge worker and consumer.
Linux

Solving the ugly key problem

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Hardware Views: 4116 Comments
Tutorial quote: You have one of the finest operating systems running on you computer and you are pleased with the setup of your desktop. Proud and happy as you are you look at your computer. You look down to the keyboard and what are those ugly keys in the lower row of your keyboard? Win-keys??!

Even though you might not be using those keys it is still annoying and stressful to see them. How can we replace them by penguin keys?

This short tip presents two solutions for this problem.
Linux

Linux tools for study and analysis of biological information

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Software Views: 2987 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article wants to show some of the advantages of Perl programming on Unix, for extraction of the biological information of the DNA, RNA and proteine sequences Databases. They can be used in comparative processes or analysis. The Human Genome project and the DNA clonation techniques have accelerated the scientific progress in this area. Daily generated information in this field outgrows often the capability of processing this information from an evolutive viewpoint.

The fast proliferation of the biological information on different genomes (dowry of genes of an organism) is driving bioinformatics as one fundamental discipline for the handling and analysis of these data.
Linux

LCD displays easy to use and easy to build

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Hardware Views: 4062 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article presents now the "basic" model: LCD display and 2 buttons; simple and easy to build for everybody.

Lcdproc used to be at the very beginning a program to display some statistics (cpu load, uptime, time, ...) on an external LCD display. Over time it has however evolved into a much more generic solution. Today the lcdproc package contains LCDd, a generic server and LCD driver, plus many clients. One of those clients is still the actual executable called lcdproc which still shows server statistics however there are also others. This client server architecture has the big advantage that you do not need to write your client in a specific language. You just need to use the simple ascii protocol between client and server.
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