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LVM Howto

Post date: January 13, 2008, 14:01 Category: System Views: 3194 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is an attempt to collect everything needed to know to get LVM up and running. The entire process of getting, compiling, installing, and setting up LVM will be covered. Pointers to LVM configurations that have been tested with will also be included. This version of the HowTo is for LVM 2 with device-mapper and LVM 1.0.8.
Linux

Hot tips to get the best of Linux in 2008

Post date: January 8, 2008, 03:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3308 Comments
Tutorial quote: At the onset of this new year - 2008 - I would like to share some Linux tips with you. It won’t matter which version are you using because I’ll talk mostly about the Linux Console. Most common windows user will probably feel the console in Linux to be a little intimidating, nevertheless when the time comes, you’ll notice that it is the best way to be highly productive.
Linux

Linux Commands Line

Post date: January 5, 2008, 22:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3959 Comments
Tutorial quote: Complete and updated list of commands on Linux - over 350 commands divided into arguments!
Linux

Arcane Linux Commands: dc

Post date: December 31, 2007, 01:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3339 Comments
Tutorial quote: If anybody within earshot of you is struggling to learn sed and ever remarks "This is like learning Klingon! Could they make it any more cryptic?", you can always point them to dc.

dc is the command-line Unix "Reverse-Polish Notation"(RPN) calculator. The name stands for "desktop calculator". OK, so what is a Polish calculator and why would you want to reverse one? The math that you do in school uses infix notation, with the operator between the numbers (3 + 5). Prefix notation puts the operator first (+ 3 5) and is what the Lisp language uses. The prefix notation is known as "Polish notation" after the nationality of Jan Łukasiewicz who invented it. Postfix notation, then, has the operator at the rear (3 5 +), and so is also the reverse of Polish notation.

What's the difference? In computer programming, you have to specify what order you want a multi-part calculation to be in. Everybody is familiar with the old problem of A*B-C. For A=5, B=3, C=2, multiplying first and subtracting second gives you 13, while subtracting first and multiplying second gives you 5. To specify which operations you want performed first, you have to either memorize the complex orders of operations (which change from one language to the next) or use a lot of parenthesis ((A*B)-C) or (A*(B-C)). Hey, that's what everybody complains about in all those languages that use parenthesis!
Linux

Linux Directory Structure

Post date: December 26, 2007, 15:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4186 Comments
Tutorial quote: The directory structure of Linux/other Unix-like systems is very intimidating for the new user, especially if he/she is migrating from Windows. In Windows, almost all programs install their files (all files) in the directory named: `Program Files.’ Such is not the case in Linux. The directory system categorises all installed files. All configuration files are in /etc, all binary files are in /bin or /usr/bin or /usr/local/bin. Here is the entire directory structure along with what they contain.
Linux

Comprehensive Linux System Services List: Explanation and Recommendation

Post date: December 17, 2007, 06:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3453 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux services are basically programs that start at boot time to provide certain features and services (Apache, the web server for example). After installation, every Linux distribution provides a list of enabled services. However, you might not need some of these services or you might need others that are not enabled by default. Having only the services you need running will make your system faster, more stable and secure. So the first thing you need to do after installing a Linux distribution is to manually edit the list of enabled services. Unfortunately, some services don’t provide a description, others provide a description that’s not understandable so you might end-up disabling a vital system service just because you didn’t know what it did and you thought you didn’t need it.
Linux

Slim Down and Speed Up Linux

Post date: December 17, 2007, 06:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 7131 Comments
Tutorial quote: While Linux is pretty efficient with a computer's resources out of the box, there are still ways you can make it run leaner and meaner on your desktop. Using a little bit of know-how, a willingness to run a few terminal commands and a mind for efficiency, you can get every last bit of power from your Linux box, or get more life from an older system. Read on for a roundup of ways to slim down and speed up Linux that any level of user can implement.
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 3307 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
Linux

How to convert any video format in Linux

Post date: December 6, 2007, 08:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 3963 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide describes how to convert any video file in Linux, such as 3gp, 3g2, flv, h264, dvd, vcd, mov, wmv, divx, xvid and wmv using WinFF, a Graphical Interface for FFmpeg. It also supports audio files convertions.
Linux

How To Manage An iPod From A Linux Desktop With Songbird 0.3

Post date: November 14, 2007, 10:11 Category: Desktop Views: 3105 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how you can use an iPod on a Linux desktop with Songbird 0.3. It covers how you can upload MP3 files from your desktop to your iPod, download MP3 files from your iPod to your desktop, and how you can delete files on the iPod. Normally, Apple's iTunes software is needed to manage an iPod, but iTunes is not available for Linux. Fortunately, there are Linux alternatives such as Songbird that can handle the task.
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