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Tunneling SSH over HTTP(S)

Post date: March 12, 2006, 09:03 Category: Network Views: 3312 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document explains how to set up an Apache server and SSH client to allow tunneling SSH over HTTP(S). This can be useful on restricted networks that either firewall everything except HTTP traffic (tcp/80) or require users to use a local (HTTP) proxy.
Unix+clones

C Lessons

Post date: March 2, 2006, 05:03 Category: Programming Views: 3121 Comments
Tutorial quote: Learn C programming from these daily lessons. They're eleven days ahead of you already so get busy...
Unix+clones

HOW TO: Setup RoundCube Webmail on Your Server

Post date: February 28, 2006, 07:02 Category: Software Views: 7043 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently heard about a new webmail client from my friend Justin, who’s infatuated with it. RoundCube, a “browser-based multilingual IMAP client with an application-like user interface,” is the latest and greatest webmail client.
Unix+clones

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Post date: February 12, 2006, 09:02 Category: Optimizing Views: 3744 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache is an open-source HTTP server implementation. It is the most popular web server on the Internet; the December 2005 Web Server Survey conducted by Netcraft [1] shows that about 70% of the web sites on Internet are using Apache.

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU, etc. But most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on Linux systems. Of course, it is assumed that there is enough hardware resources - especially enough RAM that the server isn't swapping frequently. First two sections look into various Compile-Time and Run-Time configuration options. The Run-Time section assumes that Apache is compiled with prefork MPM. HTTP compression and caching is discussed next. Finally, using separate servers for serving static and dynamic contents is covered. Basic knowledge of compiling and configuring Apache and Linux are assumed.
Unix+clones

Getting started with SSH

Post date: February 11, 2006, 04:02 Category: Network Views: 2705 Comments
Tutorial quote: The following sections hope to provide enough information to setup a user new to ssh with the appropriate files necessary for accessing remote hosts in a secure manner.
Unix+clones

Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync

Post date: February 1, 2006, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 2962 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
Unix+clones

Configuring Apache - Don't Succumb To The "Slashdot Effect"

Post date: January 31, 2006, 03:01 Category: Optimizing Views: 3794 Comments
Tutorial quote: Like many techno-geeks I host my LAMP website on a cheap ($150) computer and my broadband connection. I have also wondered what would happen if my site was linked on Slashdot or Digg. Specifically, would my setup be able to survive the "Slashdot Effect?" A Pentium 100mhz can easily saturate a T1's worth of bandwidth and my upload speed is capped (supposedly) at 384kbps, so the server should easily be able to handle that. My bandwidth will be saturated before the server is incapacitated, at least that's the idea.
Unix+clones

CLI Magic: OpenSSH + Bash

Post date: January 25, 2006, 20:01 Category: Network Views: 2880 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a system administrator, I have used OpenSSH's piping abilities more times than I can remember. The typical ssh call gets me access to systems for administration with a proven identity, but ssh is capable of so much more. In combination with bash's subshell invocation, OpenSSH can distribute the heavy work, reduce trace interference on a system under test, and make other "impossible" tasks possible. I've even used it to make Microsoft Windows remote administration easier.

In the examples below, I have tried to avoid GNU-specific idioms for tools which have non-GNU counterparts. This practice improves portability of shell scripts in heterogeneous environments.
Unix+clones

Running A MySQL-Based DNS Server: MyDNS

Post date: January 23, 2006, 15:01 Category: Network Views: 3494 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure MyDNS, a DNS server that uses a MySQL database as backend instead of configuration files like, for example, Bind or djbdns. This has the advantage that you can easily use web-based frontends to administrate your DNS records. You could even write your own frontend, e.g. using PHP, to interact with the MyDNS database. MyDNS simply reads the records from the database, and it does not have to be restarted/reloaded when DNS records change or zones are created/edited/deleted! This is a major advantage.
Unix+clones

Behind the Scenes with Apache’s .htaccess

Post date: January 16, 2006, 05:01 Category: Software Views: 3807 Comments
Tutorial quote: Although I’m a designer and not a programmer or server-side specialist, for a few years I’ve used Apache’s .htaccess to a limited degree for clients' websites, primarily for simple URL redirects and setting up custom error pages. Now that I can use Apache’s .htaccess for my own websites, I’ve been immersed in learning more about how to use this powerful tool conservatively but effectively to redirect URLs and to combat spammers and bad bots. Today’s post provides links to some of the online sources that I’ve found especially helpful.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink